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    J_9's Avatar
    J_9 Posts: 40,291, Reputation: 5645
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    #21

    Oct 12, 2019, 11:29 PM
    You’re right WG, I don’t know much about DES. I wasn’t a nurse then, I was barely out of diapers at that time. However, some of my doctor and nurse friends were in the early stages of their practices during that time.

    You did edit your original post though. In the beginning you stated it was possible to have both complete male and female organs. While I wasn’t practicing during that era, I do understand anatomy and physiology. Having both complete male and female organs is impossible. One can have a penis and ovaries, but not ovaries an testicles, for example.

    If the child has female DNA, but mostly male internal and external organs, I would support the child in how said child wants to live it’s life, male or female. It is important to keep in mind though that the medical record should note the child has XX or XY chromosomes, and that record should follow the child for a lifetime. Reason being is that there are medical conditions that are specific to only females (XX), and medical conditions that are specific to males (XY). So if a child identifies as a male, but has the XX chromosome, it is potentially at risk of a diagnosis that is specific to only the female population and visa versa, Does that make any sense?

    Now, to throw a curve ball. There are rare genetic disorders such as XX Male Syndrome (De la Chapelle syndrome) or XY gonadal dysgenesis (Swyer syndrome).
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    J_9 Posts: 40,291, Reputation: 5645
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    #22

    Oct 13, 2019, 07:33 AM
    Why are liberals always in favor of someone else spending money on something? Maybe people should go to the restroom of their biological gender like has been done for the past several thousand years.
    . I didnít think this was a political post. Maybe Iím wrong.
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    talaniman Posts: 54,174, Reputation: 10852
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    #23

    Oct 13, 2019, 08:43 AM
    It was posted in current events and of course that's a contentious cast of characters at best. 8D. You make good points about the MEDICAL reasons of gender identification though, J and I honestly never considered those implications, or possible complications down the road. I do know the road to transition is not an easy one, nor is it quick as it can take years just on the psychological and physiological fronts and is quite expensive. Then there is that social aspect, both during and after transitioning that freaks folks out initially and in many cases permanently reflected in laws and attitudes that are rocking our world.

    Humans are a complicated lot no matter where they get their guidance from.
    Wondergirl's Avatar
    Wondergirl Posts: 37,884, Reputation: 5429
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    #24

    Oct 13, 2019, 08:52 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by J_9 View Post
    You’re right WG, I don’t know much about DES. I wasn’t a nurse then, I was barely out of diapers at that time. However, some of my doctor and nurse friends were in the early stages of their practices during that time.

    You did edit edit your original post though. In the beginning you stated it was possible to have both complete male and female organs. While I wasn’t practicing during that era, I do understand anatomy and physiology. Having both complete male and female organs is impossible. One can have a penis and ovaries, but not ovaries an testicles, for example.

    If the child has female DNA, but mostly male internal and external organs, I would support the child in how said child wants to live it’s life, male or female. It is important to keep in mind though that the medical record should note the child has XX or XY chromosomes, and that record should follow the child for a lifetime. Reason being is that there are medical conditions that are specific to only females (XX), and medical conditions that are specific to males (XY). So if a child identifies as a male, but has the XX chromosome, it is potentially at risk of a diagnosis that is specific to only the female population and visa versa, Does that make any sense?

    Now, to throw a curve ball. There are rare genetic disorders such as XX Male Syndrome (De la Chapelle syndrome) or XY gonadal dysgenesis (Swyer syndrome).
    That DES mess is why OBs are very careful now as to what they prescribe to prevent miscarriages.

    Yes, I edited my OP, thanks to your comment - and will add that on that post. (Nuts, my editing time has expired!) I will check with my age 50-something friends who went through all this to find out specifics about internal and external organs. Thank you, J, for your helpful input.
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    Wondergirl Posts: 37,884, Reputation: 5429
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    #25

    Oct 13, 2019, 09:00 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by J_9 View Post
    . I didnít think this was a political post. Maybe Iím wrong.
    The LGBTQIA communit(ies) are very much in the political spotlight now.
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    #26

    Oct 13, 2019, 02:06 PM
    This is more of an ethical dilemma than it is a political one.
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    #27

    Oct 13, 2019, 02:16 PM
    Oh, and I totally understand the transgender issue. My niece, Nicole, now goes by Waylon, is in therapy to transition.

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