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-   -   How can I find the area of the inner circle and the area of the large outer circle ? (https://www.askmehelpdesk.com/mathematics/how-can-find-area-inner-circle-area-large-outer-circle-583845.html)

  • Jun 24, 2011, 11:50 AM
    tomaus
    How can I find the area of the inner circle and the area of the large outer circle ?
    Joe's centrepiece is a simple but very effective use of two circles and
    Two regular hexagons rotated to give the effect of a medieval dial. The
    Radius of the inner circle is 10 cm, half the length of the sides of the
    Regular hexagon. AC is a side of one of the hexagons and BD is a side
    Of the second, which is obtained from the first by rotation.

    (I) Find the area of the inner circle, giving your answer in terms of π.
    (ii) Find the area of the large outer circle also in terms of π and
    Hence express the area of the inner circle as a percentage of the
    Area of the large outer circle.
    Hint: Each hexagon can be divided into six congruent equilateral
    Triangles, for example the triangle AMC is one of the six
    Equilateral triangles that make up one hexagon and the triangle
    BMD is one of six equilateral triangles that make up the second
    Hexagon.
  • Jun 24, 2011, 12:38 PM
    ebaines

    First, it's clear that there is a figure that is supposed to accompany this question, so please post it. Otherwise it's impossible to tell what you're talking about.

    Second, please show us what work you've done to try and solve this yourself. Show us what you've tried and where you got stuck, and we can help. But we won't just do your homework for you.
  • Jun 24, 2011, 01:55 PM
    jcaron2
    Tomaus, if you reread the question you just posted, you'll see that it's impossible to answer because several of the characters that you lazily copied and pasted are garbled. It's also clear that there's supposed to be a diagram to go with the problem.

    Since we can't answer the question anyway, perhaps this is a good time to point out the rules for homework problems. Hopefully you'll put slightly more effort into reading that than you did into reading your own question.
  • Jun 24, 2011, 01:55 PM
    jcaron2
    Comment on ebaines's post
    LOL. Guess you already beat me to it.

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