Ask Me Help Desk

Ask Me Help Desk (https://www.askmehelpdesk.com/forum.php)
-   Electrical & Lighting (https://www.askmehelpdesk.com/forumdisplay.php?f=105)
-   -   Connecting new 220V line & tapping off a 110V outlet. (https://www.askmehelpdesk.com/showthread.php?t=239152)

  • Jul 19, 2008, 05:56 AM
    rkbynum
    Connecting new 220V line & tapping off a 110V outlet.
    I have a 220V outlet on the outside of my garage, originally intended to power 220v compressors, welders, etc. I am installing a well not far from this outlet, which needs 220V and I want to run a line from the outlet (underground) line to the pump. How do I do the connections to the pump and can I come off this 220V line and get 110V for a heater to be installed next to the pump?

    Thanks in advance!
  • Jul 19, 2008, 07:00 AM
    hkstroud
    Basically not a good idea. You can use 240V welder line for th pump but you will have to lower the circuit breaker protect the wiring to the pump. If you do not have a neutral in the welder line you of course cannot get 120V circuit from it. If you do have a neutral line and tie in to it for the heater, the combined use of the heater and the pump will probably exceed the circuit breaker amperage. Even if it doesn't, who knows what you are doing to the amperage at the pump motor. Assuming a submersible pump, you don't want to be pulling and replacing a pump motor to save a few feet of wire.
  • Jul 19, 2008, 07:16 AM
    rkbynum
    Thanks for the quick response. Just to double-check - I can use the existing wire to a control box with a new circuit breaker rated for the new well pump. But, the best idea for the 110V is to run another line, separate from the 220V line, add a c/b at the control box I used for the 220 and then to a new outlet.

    Randy
  • Jul 19, 2008, 07:52 AM
    hkstroud
    Yes , you could change out the existing welder outlet for a subpanel providing that the existing wiring is a 3 conductors with ground and is of sufficient size to provide the amperage of both the pump and the heater. To do that you would leave the existing breaker at the main panel, install the subpanel with a double breaker for the well and a single breaker for the heater. Otherwise reduce the breaker at the main panel to fit the size of the well wiring, probably 20 amps, use the welder box as a junction box and connect the well wiring. Run a separate line from the main panel to the garage for the heater. Depend on distance and difficulty of installing a cable from the main panel to the garage this may be the most economical approach.
  • Jul 19, 2008, 12:24 PM
    rkbynum
    Thanks very much!

    Randy

  • All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:46 PM.