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    Xan-Kriegor's Avatar
    Xan-Kriegor Posts: 158, Reputation: -2
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    #1

    Feb 20, 2017, 09:14 AM
    Problem with Border Collie behaviour.
    I have a Border Collie (male, 10 months old, pure).
    Every time he sees someone (doesn't matter who) enter a car (doesn't matter whose),
    He starts to sprint left and right, bark constantly and jumping with his full weight on the fence.

    Extra information: he used to be afraid of cars when he was a pup (everytime 1 passed he would sit down and refuse to move), but not anymore.
    Catsmine's Avatar
    Catsmine Posts: 3,827, Reputation: 739
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    #2

    Feb 20, 2017, 01:42 PM
    From being afraid of cars to attacking them as he matures. Sounds pretty normal for a high strung breed like border collies. Does he show any anxiety entering one?
    Alty's Avatar
    Alty Posts: 28,318, Reputation: 5972
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    #3

    Feb 20, 2017, 11:51 PM
    How often is he exercised? Is he able to run, go for walks, for at least 3 hours a day or is he confined to the yard?

    Border collies need a lot of exercise, they also need to work. Now, if you're not a farmer and don't have sheep for him to herd, there are other things that can give him the physical and mental stimulation he needs. Training for agility is a great way to keep your border collie well balanced.

    To me it sounds like he's got too much pent up energy.
    joypulv's Avatar
    joypulv Posts: 21,593, Reputation: 2941
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    #4

    Feb 21, 2017, 04:08 AM
    I agree with all the above. If you can't work, or at least play, with him a lot every day, you shouldn't have a border collie.
    tickle's Avatar
    tickle Posts: 23,800, Reputation: 2674
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    #5

    Feb 21, 2017, 04:12 AM
    Yes, I agree, working dogs, like the border collie, need plenty of exercise. I understand that if they cant use their inherent breeding of herding cattle, they will herd anything. You need to get your dog some work, as Alty suggested, agility training would be excellent.
    Alty's Avatar
    Alty Posts: 28,318, Reputation: 5972
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    #6

    Feb 21, 2017, 07:28 PM
    I actually have 3 dogs, all dogs that need work to keep them happy, and I'm not a very active person, especially in the winter when it's too cold to leave the house, much less go for long walks every day.

    One of my dogs is a 5 year old border collie. Now he does get a lot of exercise playing with his two brothers, a 9 year old beagle and a 1 year old terrier. But we do a lot of other things, especially in the winter, to keep him happy, to keep his breed happy, and that's what it's all about, his breed.

    We live in the suburbs, our yard isn't huge, there's no cattle to herd, and like I said, in the winter when it's -30C and the snow is up to your knees, no way anyone is going for walks.

    Border collies are driven to herd, to work, to play. Their play drive is over the top, and that's actually why they're so easy to train, because training them with play, works!

    If it's too cold out to do the 3 hours or more (more is always better with this breed, because they can go 12 hours running full tilt after sheep and still have stamina to do more) that they need every day to keep them from going nuts and making you nuts, then play at home. Hide a treat in the house, then get him to find it. When he does, major praise! Border collies are praise driven, unlike beagles and terriers which are treat driven. For BC's they just want the praise of their pack leader, and that's you.

    Play hide and seek, you hide, let him find you. Fetch, if you can get outside, is a great way to burn off that energy, and BC's have tons of energy. Throw until your arm can't throw anymore, because I promise that you'll get tired before he does.

    Like I mentioned in my first post, agility training is great for BC's. They excel at it. If you look up videos online for agility competitions you'll notice that the majority of the dogs that compete in these competitions are BC's. Why? They have the stamina, they are easy to train, they're very intelligent, and they just love to work, no matter what the work is.

    There are agility training camps everywhere, and many train indoors if you're in a country where the winters are cold. It can get pricey, but where I am it's comparable to taking your dog to puppy training classes, and with a BC the agility classes are worth so much more than puppy classes although your dog will need basic training before starting agility training (sit, stay, heel, come).

    Bottom line, a high energy dog that's not getting the stimulation he needs, will become a nuisance. Barking at cars, barking or going after other dogs or cats, escaping the yard or house, even biting if it gets bad enough.

    Also, your dog is a young dog, and pups have even more energy than grown dogs, so right now he seems to not be getting what he needs to keep him a healthy happy dog. I really think added exercise and getting him involved in something like agility, would go a long way in making him the dog you want him to be, and agility, it's a sport both of you do, and it's a lot of fun. Challenging, but so rewarding for both of you, and it will strengthen the bond you have with him.

    I can help you find an agility trainer near you if you like. You can PM where you live (not your address, but country, state or province, city, town, hamlet, general area, and I can and will do some research for you.

    I highly highly recommend agility for any BC owner that doesn't use their BC as a work dog on their farm.
    Xan-Kriegor's Avatar
    Xan-Kriegor Posts: 158, Reputation: -2
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    #7

    Feb 22, 2017, 08:11 AM
    He doesn't show anxiety when he enters the car. (But he rarely had to enter the car. Maybe 10 times in his lifetime)

    I have a big yard. And the dog's always in the yard except if it's below 0 degree Celsius outside or if it's raining (He sleeps in a dog house outside).
    I walk from 1,5 hours to 3 hours a day with him.
    He has a lot of toys to play with.
    He is very social.
    He never EVER runs out of energy.
    tickle's Avatar
    tickle Posts: 23,800, Reputation: 2674
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    #8

    Feb 22, 2017, 01:05 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by Xan-Kriegor View Post
    He doesn't show anxiety when he enters the car. (But he rarely had to enter the car. Maybe 10 times in his lifetime)

    I have a big yard. And the dog's always in the yard except if it's below 0 degree Celsius outside or if it's raining (He sleeps in a dog house outside).
    I walk from 1,5 hours to 3 hours a day with him.
    He has a lot of toys to play with.
    He is very social.
    He never EVER runs out of energy.
    Yes but do you play with him, with his toys, or do you leave him to his own devices. What we are saying is that, sure its great all that walking, but his brain his wired to work, and while walking he is not working, while playing with the toys, he is not working. He is a working breed; needs stimulation; has to run out of energy if he is doing the things he was inherently trained to do.
    Wondergirl's Avatar
    Wondergirl Posts: 38,812, Reputation: 5431
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    #9

    Feb 22, 2017, 01:18 PM
    Is he chained or does he have the entire yard to run around in?
    Alty's Avatar
    Alty Posts: 28,318, Reputation: 5972
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    #10

    Feb 22, 2017, 05:39 PM
    I'm going to have to bow out of the conversation because I won't be able to post nicely. I will say that I don't understand why people get dogs if they don't want to have the dogs in their lives. An outside dog is always going to have issues. Dogs are pack members, they don't like to be alone. A dog that's not allowed to be a part of the family, sleep with his pack, be with his pack, is not going to be a happy dog, and unhappy dogs act out.

    If you want a lawn ornament get a bird bath.

    Good luck.
    tickle's Avatar
    tickle Posts: 23,800, Reputation: 2674
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    #11

    Feb 23, 2017, 04:31 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by Alty View Post
    I'm going to have to bow out of the conversation because I won't be able to post nicely. I will say that I don't understand why people get dogs if they don't want to have the dogs in their lives. An outside dog is always going to have issues. Dogs are pack members, they don't like to be alone. A dog that's not allowed to be a part of the family, sleep with his pack, be with his pack, is not going to be a happy dog, and unhappy dogs act out.

    If you want a lawn ornament get a bird bath.

    Good luck.
    Totallyagree!
    Xan-Kriegor's Avatar
    Xan-Kriegor Posts: 158, Reputation: -2
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    #12

    Feb 23, 2017, 10:23 AM
    He runs around freely. No chains.

    (Alty) You could've just not answer you know. I don't give a donut about your opinion about dogs being equal to people.
    The only thing I'm interested in is why he hates or is afraid of cars.
    tickle's Avatar
    tickle Posts: 23,800, Reputation: 2674
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    #13

    Feb 23, 2017, 06:23 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by Xan-Kriegor View Post
    He runs around freely. No chains.

    (Alty) You could've just not answer you know. I don't give a donut about your opinion about dogs being equal to people.
    The only thing I'm interested in is why he hates or is afraid of cars.
    You don't get an opinion on who answers, it is an open site. You need a trainer who can ACTUALLY see his reaction to cars. He obviously has an anxiety. Get it solved by spending some money if you care about yr dog.
    Alty's Avatar
    Alty Posts: 28,318, Reputation: 5972
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    #14

    Feb 23, 2017, 06:34 PM
    He runs around freely. No chains.

    (Alty) You could've just not answer you know. I don't give a donut about your opinion about dogs being equal to people.
    The only thing I'm interested in is why he hates or is afraid of cars.
    He barks at cars, isn't afraid of them otherwise you'd never be able to get him near one or in one.

    He barks at cars because he's frustrated. He's frustrated because he's a working breed dog that isn't given the stimulation he needs. He's frustrated because he sleeps outside alone in his dog house without a pack. He's frustrated because he isn't being given the care or family he needs and deserves.

    I answered you, you just don't want to accept my answer because it's clear that you're not being the owner this dog deserves.

    I never said dogs are equal to people. Dogs are dogs. Dogs are very different than people. You don't know dog behavior, and that's why you're having problems.

    I do have to ask, why do you have a dog, especially a border collie? You obviously don't have a farm and need a border collie to work the farm, and you obviously don't want a dog in your life, in your home, in your family. So why do you have a dog? I'm not trying to be mean, I'm trying to understand, because I don't understand why someone gets a dog if all they're going to do is put him in the backyard and only spend time with him when it's convenient.

    You may not "give a donut" about my opinion, but you asked for advice, and I'm giving you the best advice anyone can give you. I'm not the Pets expert on this site because I'm pretty, because I'm far from it. I'm the Pet expert because I know what I'm talking about, and any trainer or animal behaviorist will tell you exactly what I just did, only it would cost you hundreds of dollars.

    If you would put your pride aside you'd realize that I'm right and you'd do what's best for this dog, because he's not your property, and he deserves the best, which you're not giving him. Doesn't make you an evil person, and I'm not saying that you are evil, I'm saying you aren't informed enough to have a dog. I'm also saying that if you make changes, listen, learn, that you can become the person that this dog needs. But right now you're not a good owner, and until you actually listen, you won't be one.

    Let me know if you can put your pride aside and actually take the advice to help your dog. I'm more than willing to help, but I won't help someone that doesn't actually want the help. Remember, you came here, I didn't come to you. If you ask a question it stands to reason to be wiling to listen to the answer, because you obviously don't have the answer, otherwise you wouldn't need to ask the question.

    I'll be here, let me know.

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