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    schoolgirl_101's Avatar
    schoolgirl_101 Posts: 2, Reputation: 1
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    #1

    Nov 21, 2007, 08:49 PM
    The scientific name for archaebacteria
    Hi I'm in middle schooland I have aproject due on the fourth, and it's about the six kingdoms. I want to know if anyone knows the scientific name for archaebacteria? If so help me because the project is worth two letter grades (two test grades) thanks
    tickle's Avatar
    tickle Posts: 23,801, Reputation: 2674
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    #2

    Nov 22, 2007, 05:17 AM
    The scientific name is extremophiles: and here is a good description of what they are:

    Archaebacteria are a type of prokaryote, that is, a unicellular organism without a cell nucleus. They make up the kingdom Archae, one of the main kingdoms of life. Archaebacteria are difficult to classify because they have similarities to both normal bacteria and the larger eukaryotes. In structure, they are like unicellular prokaryotes, but the genetic transcription and translation underlying their creation is similar to that of the more complex eukaryotes.

    Able to live in a variety of environments, archaebacteria are known as extremophiles. Certain species are able to live in temperatures above boiling point at 100° Celsius or 212° Fahrenheit. Archaebacteria can also thrive in very saline, acidic, or alkaline aquatic environments. They employ a variety of chemical tricks to accomplish this, with one species, halobacteria, able to convert light into adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or cell energy, using a non-photosynthetic process. Halobacteria live in waters almost completely saturated with salt, and unlike photosynthetic plants, are incapable of extracting carbon from atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    Archaebacteria have a size between 1/10th of a micrometer to over 15 micrometers. (A human hair is about 100 micrometers in width.) Some possess flagella, but these are substantially different in structure than the flagella bacteria have. In 1999, Pyrococcus abyssi, one of the toughest archaebacteria on Earth, had its genome sequenced. Further study of its resilience to extreme temperatures is expected to have applications in the biotechnology industry. Archaebacteria are non-pathogenic, living in and around other organisms but not infecting them. Some are able to withstand pressures of above 200 atmospheres, allowing them to thrive deep within the Earth.

    Archaebacteria were not recognized as a distinct form of life from bacteria until 1977, when Carl Woese and George Fox determined this through RNA studies. However, the kingdom Archae has a close relationship to the kingdom Eukarya, the two sharing many genetic trees and common traits. One of the first places Archae were discovered was at the boiling hot springs in Yellowstone National Park.
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    #3

    Sep 27, 2008, 05:47 PM

    I think that the scientific name of Archaeabacteria is "extemophiles" because most of its species are found in places that seem extreme to us, like in the dead sea, many "salt lovers" or Halophiles could be found... :D
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    #4

    Nov 9, 2009, 04:40 PM
    Your are wrong
    tickle's Avatar
    tickle Posts: 23,801, Reputation: 2674
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    #5

    Nov 9, 2009, 05:19 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by golf365247 View Post
    your are wrong
    You can't just say 'you are wrong'. You have to substantiate your claim with more up to date information or references that you have found to dispute this. So, where are your references, golf ?

    Tick
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    sveegaard Posts: 13, Reputation: 3
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    #6

    Feb 21, 2010, 11:15 AM

    Extremophiles is not the scientific name of archaeabacteria - extremophilicity is the "love" of extreme environments, but not only archaeabacteria are of this type. Some ordinary bacteria are extremeophiles.
    I remember the scientific name to be as simple as 'arcaea'.
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    #7

    Nov 7, 2010, 10:28 PM
    There are many species of archebacteria, here is a scientific name for one of Many: "Pyrococcus furiosus
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    #8

    Mar 30, 2011, 07:51 PM
    Weeeee hoooo i hate biology im in 9th and wow can't someone make a website that has archaebecteria with common and scientific names with pic!! ***!!
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    #9

    Mar 30, 2011, 07:52 PM
    Gama Tickle, your kind of anoying
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    #10

    Jan 30, 2013, 04:05 PM
    U guys are no help
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    #11

    Jan 30, 2013, 04:05 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by tickle View Post
    The scientific name is extremophiles: and here is a good description of what they are:

    Archaebacteria are a type of prokaryote, that is, a unicellular organism without a cell nucleus. They make up the kingdom Archae, one of the main kingdoms of life. Archaebacteria are difficult to classify because they have similarities to both normal bacteria and the larger eukaryotes. In structure, they are like unicellular prokaryotes, but the genetic transcription and translation underlying their creation is similar to that of the more complex eukaryotes.

    Able to live in a variety of environments, archaebacteria are known as extremophiles. Certain species are able to live in temperatures above boiling point at 100 Celsius or 212 Fahrenheit. Archaebacteria can also thrive in very saline, acidic, or alkaline aquatic environments. They employ a variety of chemical tricks to accomplish this, with one species, halobacteria, able to convert light into adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or cell energy, using a non-photosynthetic process. Halobacteria live in waters almost completely saturated with salt, and unlike photosynthetic plants, are incapable of extracting carbon from atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    Archaebacteria have a size between 1/10th of a micrometer to over 15 micrometers. (A human hair is about 100 micrometers in width.) Some possess flagella, but these are substantially different in structure than the flagella bacteria have. In 1999, Pyrococcus abyssi, one of the toughest archaebacteria on Earth, had its genome sequenced. Further study of its resilience to extreme temperatures is expected to have applications in the biotechnology industry. Archaebacteria are non-pathogenic, living in and around other organisms but not infecting them. Some are able to withstand pressures of above 200 atmospheres, allowing them to thrive deep within the Earth.

    Archaebacteria were not recognized as a distinct form of life from bacteria until 1977, when Carl Woese and George Fox determined this through RNA studies. However, the kingdom Archae has a close relationship to the kingdom Eukarya, the two sharing many genetic trees and common traits. One of the first places Archae were discovered was at the boiling hot springs in Yellowstone National Park.
    No help what so ever
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    #12

    Jan 30, 2013, 04:06 PM
    That is so wrong
    tickle's Avatar
    tickle Posts: 23,801, Reputation: 2674
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    #13

    Jan 30, 2013, 05:51 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by DestiniLauren View Post
    that is so wrong
    Prove it

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