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    sab2768's Avatar
    sab2768 Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #1

    Sep 4, 2015, 06:28 PM
    Spotty work history
    I have a storied history. I'm a 44 yr old female that returned to college in 2012 to finish a BS degree in Biotechnology. Prior to my return to school, I worked mostly in the retail sector and unconventionally, horse farm management. My most recent job was managing a horse farm for 4 years, but prior to that, my work history bounces around quite a bit. Most of the retail in during the late 90s and 2000s was in the design industry (Lowes Home Improvement (2 years) and a couple of cabinet companies). I have worked for a LOT of different companies over the years... and have quite a few short term jobs and gaps in my resume. Additionally, I was terminated from Lowe's in 2002, but was rehired at a different location in 2004. I also have an arrest record (2002) that was ultimately dropped (not prosecuted) for driving a suspended license.


    I am scared to death that now that I have racked up 25k in student loans that no one will give me a second look based on my previous work history. I've read where you can leave some work history off your resume, but you MUST included EVERYWHERE you've ever worked in you life on the job application.


    1st question:
    Do you really have to include every job you've ever held on an application that states it must be true and complete history? Frankly, I'm not sure I even remember absolutely everywhere I have worked over my lifetime. How does one make sure all the dates are correct when I don't have older employment records on hand?


    2nd question:
    Since returning to college, I have found my passion (genetics) and have kept a 4.0 adjusted gpa. I am currently taking a directed methods class (2 semesters now) to gain lab experience while in school and am also working as a student assistant an my college (small paycheck) to set up labs for my professor. I will finish my degree with 2 semesters of clinical internship in genetics. Does this commitment to my education in anyway make up for the checkered work history of my past?

    Please help!
    Fr_Chuck's Avatar
    Fr_Chuck Posts: 81,278, Reputation: 7690
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    #2

    Sep 4, 2015, 07:23 PM
    First unless you are going to work for some national security clearance position, I do not know anywhere that wants more than the last 5 to 10 years and most only the last few jobs.

    Also on a resume, don't list where you work, use a skill type resume, that merely shows the skills and knowledge, not specific work places. There are several types of resumes, learn about marketing your skills.

    Each place will be different, some places if they see jobs with less than a year, may not even consider you, period. Other places understand re-inventing yourself.
    joypulv's Avatar
    joypulv Posts: 21,593, Reputation: 2941
    current pert
     
    #3

    Sep 5, 2015, 04:42 AM
    You MUST include what? No, there are no musts.
    A very seasoned headhunter told me once that they expect that everyone lies, lies, lies when job hunting, whether on a resume, application, or verbal interview. It's considered to be selling yourself with a dash of hype. They even know by how much they lie, when numbers are involved. So do you lie just like most everyone else? I always did, and never once felt a twinge of guilt. Work is a dog eat dog world. And no one is fooled by "I directed a project compiling data research on the effects of the moon on marigolds" being any more than you were in charge of the collating functions on the big copier.

    Anyway, tailor your resume to each job. Keep the truth as a template to work off of.
    Fill in gaps with whatever you want, truthful or not. I always said I had to care for a parent.
    Don't go back further than the 4 year horse job. Write a 2 sentence summary of the years before that.
    A resume should be ONE PAGE.
    A cover letter half a page.
    talaniman's Avatar
    talaniman Posts: 53,915, Reputation: 10852
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    #4

    Sep 5, 2015, 08:29 AM
    Job search engines like Careerbuilders have many helpful tips and templates for resume building.
    Craftresumes's Avatar
    Craftresumes Posts: 2, Reputation: 1
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    #5

    Oct 8, 2015, 03:24 AM
    Well in case you do not remember exact dates for your previous jobs, it is still OK. You can mention the organization name and your role over there. Rest you can explain during an interview if asked. Try not to lie while filling up the gap you have had. This can make you nervous in an interview. You can leave it as it is and give clarifications to the interviewer later on. Definitely your sincere efforts at your college will add strength to your resume. Keep doing the good work.
    tickle's Avatar
    tickle Posts: 23,801, Reputation: 2674
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    #6

    Oct 8, 2015, 04:21 AM
    I totally agree with Craftresumes, try not to lie, during an interview you don't want to appear to be sweating it out while reaching for answers. And no, you don't have to include every job you have ever had; just last five years to make it easy for them to check references.

    i have never heard that head hunters expect everyone to lie lie lie.
    smoothy's Avatar
    smoothy Posts: 25,495, Reputation: 2853
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    #7

    Oct 8, 2015, 04:48 AM
    So many people ave flat out lied on their resumes most employers are now NEEDING to check on claimed work history etc. Any false claims found during the selection process will immediately remove you from considerations (they will simply NOT call you) and those discovered after hiring could result in termination no matter how long after its discovered.

    Putting the best light on something isn't a lie... as long as its true. And I agree with Tickle. Headhunters will quickly destroy their reputation in the business community and their future business if they encourage or tolerate lies.

    Also if you make claims you know something and have done it on your resume. The better be true, because your employer has every expectation that you do already know it and can expect you to be proficient in it with no training on their part.
    joypulv's Avatar
    joypulv Posts: 21,593, Reputation: 2941
    current pert
     
    #8

    Oct 8, 2015, 06:39 AM
    The headhunter I was quoting also told me that they assume that resumes are inflated by 10% across the board, on salary, on time worked, or status, everything.
    Yes, he was trying to give me advice. He was also trying to get me to meet him for a drink that evening. I agreed and never showed. I lied.
    Questionair's Avatar
    Questionair Posts: 53, Reputation: 4
    Junior Member
     
    #9

    Oct 8, 2015, 07:22 AM
    Resumes are constantly inflated, I suggest the same thing someone else stated above. List your skill set, that is what any company is really looking for.

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