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    jaxon's Avatar
    jaxon Posts: 11, Reputation: 1
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    #1

    Feb 15, 2006, 04:16 PM
    Water pressure TOO high
    We purchased our house 2 years ago and it is about 14 years old now. I have noticed that the water pressure (hot or cold) is extremely high. It is the same in all faucets: tubs, sinks, toilets etc. We do not get any "banging" of the pipes but it can get crasy with the kids when they turn the water on. If they turn it on too fast and they are running water in a bowl or glass it can shoot out onto their clothes.. hehehehehehe.. sorry...

    Only 2 people can take a shower within an hour or so although we have a hot water heater and it appears to be working fine. It just "runs" the hot water out sooo fast because of the high pressure. What can be done to resolve this.. thx.
    Lotta's Avatar
    Lotta Posts: 124, Reputation: 8
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    #2

    Feb 15, 2006, 05:06 PM
    You can install a pressure regulator on the main water line after it enters the house.

    You can also install low flow shower heads on the showers but this will not help with the other faucets.
    jaxon's Avatar
    jaxon Posts: 11, Reputation: 1
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    #3

    Feb 15, 2006, 08:02 PM
    Ok what should the water pressure be AFTER the pressure regulator. I checked the pressure today by putting a gauge on the faucet on the outside of the house and it said 80 psi. The water dept here in my town told me that they checked it for me and the pressure was "within their specs" and there was nothing that they could do for me.

    I got up under the house and I do not have a pressure regulator installed. So I'm guessing that I need to put the regulator in on the main as it comes in under the house and before and take offs? Cause installing it in my supply closet outside on the back of the house where the hot water heater is would be a heck of a lot easier than climbing back under my house. Thanks
    PalmMP3's Avatar
    PalmMP3 Posts: 321, Reputation: 28
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    #4

    Feb 16, 2006, 12:16 AM
    80 PSI is the maximum safe pressure - i.e. anything more than 80 PSI requires pressure regulation to prevent your pipes from going nuclear; 80 PSI or less is pretty safe (although pushing the limit) for the pipes' health, but you may not prefer it that high. That's why your water company said it's "within their specs" - 80 is technically an OK number.

    Consider yourself lucky: it's a heck of a lot easier - and cheaper - to fix a "pressure too high" situation than it is to fix a "pressure too low situation".

    If you decide to install a PRV (pressure reducing valve), the ideal pressure is around 40 PSI, although you may want to go a bit higher than that, so that you get better-feeling showers with less water wasted. Look for a PRV with a range of 40 PSI (or lower) through 70 or 80 PSI (in case you later decide that you liked the higher pressure better, you will have the option of raising the pressure simply by adjusting a screw, without having to uninstall the valve).

    As for the installation location, I have good news: not only can you install the PRV in the supply closet, but I would even go so far as to recommend it. Here's why: since the pressure reduction is purely optional in your case (like I said before, 80 PSI is not particularly unhealthy for the pipes), what you're focusing on is making life easier for yourself and your family. So here's what's accomplished: a) you said it's easier to install in the closet, and since it's highly unlikely that any fixtures feed off it before that (since most fixtures nedd a hot water feed anyway), installing it in the closet will still accomplish the point of making turning on the sink more pleasant, and you don't have to worry about the pipes between the water main and the closet, since they can handle 80 PSI. b) I wouldn't be surprised if your outside hose bibs feed off the main line before the supply closet. If they do, you can continue to have 80 PSI at the outdoor hose bibs (for washing your car, or other outdoor activities where the higher pressure is preferable) while having a more pleasant 40-50 PSI at the indoor fixtures.

    A word of warning, though: many (if not all) PRV's are of the "check valve" variety, meaning that they will only allow water to flow through them in one direction. This may pose a dangerous problem with your water heater: when the water is heated, it expands, pushing back out toward the supply. With a one-way valve in place, the expanding water will have no place to go, and can result in nasty consequences. To remedy this situation, make sure you're your TPR (temperature/pressure relief) valve is in good condition, and preferably you should have some safety device for handling thermal expansion, such as a pressure safety tank.

    Hope this helps,
    Moishe
    Note: if this post was helpful, please rate it by clicking "Comment on this Post" in the upper-right corner of this post. Thank you.
    jaxon's Avatar
    jaxon Posts: 11, Reputation: 1
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    #5

    Feb 16, 2006, 04:36 AM
    PalmMP3 I would like to thank you for your help. Since I work in the Industrial Air conditioning Maintenance field I know I can install the PRV and Expansion tank since I deal with them on a regular basis. My only problem was I did not know how they worked in a "residental" situation like I described. Once again thanks for your help.
    fredg's Avatar
    fredg Posts: 4,928, Reputation: 674
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    #6

    Feb 16, 2006, 05:30 AM
    Hi,
    I tried giving Palm an "Approval" for the excellent comments, but got the old "you must spread it around some more...." pop-up.
    My own water pressure is 40 psi, but would like to recommend using 50.
    I have a "beneath the house" pressure valve (which can regulate the pressure with a turn bolt on top), then right past that, a pressure gauge.
    The combination works fine. Best of luck.
    speedball1's Avatar
    speedball1 Posts: 29,301, Reputation: 1939
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    #7

    Feb 16, 2006, 07:38 AM
    I too would have liked to place a " great answer" in the comment section and got the same pop-up Fred did. Moshie touched all bases, including the problem of a check valve in the PRV. Good job Moshie!!
    I would like to comment on the average homes water pressure. The average is 45 PSI,( That's why water towers are 100 feet tall.) 80 PSI is almost twice that and puts a strain on the entire system. Joints,connections and faucets with washers with seats. And if you get water hammer at 80PSI it's the kiss of death for soldered joints at elbo connections. I suggest you keep the pressure at 50PSI or below as Fred suggested. Good luck, Tom
    PalmMP3's Avatar
    PalmMP3 Posts: 321, Reputation: 28
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    #8

    Feb 16, 2006, 01:47 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by fredg
    Hi,
    I tried giving Palm an "Approval" for the excellent comments, but got the old "you must spread it around some more...." pop-up.
    Thank you very much! You probably couldn't do it because you just rated this post.

    Same thing goes for Tom:
    Quote Originally Posted by speedball1
    I too would have liked to place a " great answer" in the comment section and got the same pop-up Fred did.
    Looks like you haven't rated anyone's else's post since this one.

    Thank you both for the vote of confidence anyway. I really appreciate it! :)

    Naturally, if you want, I'd be more than happy to remind you guys in a couple of days (via Private Message) to come back and rate my post, after you've had a chance to rate someone else's... :D:D:D

    Thanks again!
    Moishe
    speedball1's Avatar
    speedball1 Posts: 29,301, Reputation: 1939
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    #9

    Feb 16, 2006, 03:46 PM
    Moshie,
    I don't give out too many comments unless it's a outstanding answer. Perhaps I should comment more but I don't get out of the plumbing page too much. Tom
    shader's Avatar
    shader Posts: 235, Reputation: 12
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    #10

    Feb 16, 2006, 04:16 PM
    It appears that the recommeded max pressure is 50lbs +/-. I have well water and use a 40/60 pressure switch. Obviously it doesn't stay at 60 since the pressure will vary as the water is used-but is 60 too high for this application? Use a 30/50 switch? The switch will kick off at 60 and then kind of settles at 55/56 lbs. All the plumbing is new.
    PalmMP3's Avatar
    PalmMP3 Posts: 321, Reputation: 28
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    #11

    Feb 17, 2006, 11:10 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by speedball1
    Hi Jaxon,

    City water or pump? If city water do you have a pressure regulator? If on a pump how high is the control set for? I'll wait on your answer. Tom
    Um, Tom? You seem to have overlooked the fact that this question has been taken care of already, and at great length, too - you probably linked directly to page 2 and didn't notice all the responses already there... :D:D:D

    Moishe
    speedball1's Avatar
    speedball1 Posts: 29,301, Reputation: 1939
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    #12

    Feb 17, 2006, 11:36 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by PalmMP3
    Um, Tom? You seem to have overlooked the fact that this question has been taken care of already, and at great length, too - you probably linked directly to page 2 and didn't notice all the responses already there... :D:D:D

    Moishe
    Yeah! I answered Shader and didn't check the 1stpage for Jaxon. There has been a lot of trafficthis morning and I fell a little snowed under. But I'm digging out. Thanks for the reminder. Tom
    knipknup's Avatar
    knipknup Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #13

    Feb 23, 2010, 11:37 AM
    I just want to add my thanks for a very helpful post. Though it started several years ago, it was very handy and answered my question. Another thing I want to add is that with the safety reserve tank, there is a bicycle air valve at the bottom. The pressure in this bottom of the tank should match the pressure in your water line, so put a water gauge on the water and use an air gauge on the bottom of the tank and once you get your water pressure where you want it (45psi), add or relieve air from the tank through the stem as you would a tire until it matches the same pressure of air (45psi). This will ensure the membrane in your reserve tank isn't damaged from unbalance pressure in a water hammer situation.
    kctyphoon's Avatar
    kctyphoon Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #14

    May 17, 2010, 05:00 PM

    Before you go out and spend money, you may want to try just closing the main shut off valve a little bit.. turn it all the way off, open a nearby faucet, and slowly open up the main valve until you have the desired pressure.. maybe its just me, but that's the first thing id try.. if you don't want to effect the entire house, you can easily do the faucets by adjusting the shut valves under the sinks.. and then maybe a low flow shower head.. this way your washing machine, dishwasher, garden hose, etc. will all remain nice and storng.
    Milo Dolezal's Avatar
    Milo Dolezal Posts: 7,192, Reputation: 523
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    #15

    May 17, 2010, 05:20 PM

    This original question is from 2006. Please, start your own thread. Thank You
    fredy101's Avatar
    fredy101 Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #16

    Nov 15, 2011, 02:09 PM
    Be very careful if you hook up in the house and you change only part of the pressure then you can get a back flow this can cause cold water lines to become hot do all the home or make sure hot and cold don't separate before and after. Pipes that should be cold water will turn very hot and your cold will not cool down the hot.
    Milo Dolezal's Avatar
    Milo Dolezal Posts: 7,192, Reputation: 523
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    #17

    Nov 15, 2011, 07:07 PM
    Fredy101, welcome to AMHD. You are responding to 5 1/2 years old question. This thread is dead. Make sure you check date before you answer. Thank you. Milo

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