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    pfilias's Avatar
    pfilias Posts: 4, Reputation: 1
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    #1

    Dec 1, 2005, 12:14 PM
    Toilet bubbles when washing machine empties
    When my washing machine empties into the washtub, the nearby toilet has recently (about the past four - five months) started to have big air bubbles come out of the toilet bowl, making a very loud bwoop bwoop bwoop sound. The bubbles are so large that they actually cause water to splash on the inside of the toilet lid.

    The bathroom sink next to the toilet already has one of those "chimney" vents, so I can't see air being trapped in there, but I'm no plumber.

    I've already snaked the house's vent PVC, and I've put industrial strength drain opener down all the nearby drains.

    I'd appreciate any help the plumbing community could offer.

    Thanks.
    fredg's Avatar
    fredg Posts: 4,929, Reputation: 674
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    #2

    Dec 1, 2005, 01:03 PM
    Bubbling
    Hi,
    I am not a plumber either, but maybe one will along later to give you a better, probably more specific, answer.
    Meantime, do you have a septic tank? If so, it might need pumping out. I have a septic, and once in the past 3 yrs, the same thing, bubbling, started happening. I had the septic (1,000 gals) pumped out, and all is well. They also found another problem in the septic causing the fluids not to go into the drainage fields, causing the fluid build-up in the septic tank.
    pfilias's Avatar
    pfilias Posts: 4, Reputation: 1
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    #3

    Dec 1, 2005, 02:22 PM
    No septic. However, I got this answer from a plubmer, via MSN IM:

    (14:50:42) Peter Filias: Excellent. I have a simple question (hopefully).
    (14:50:44) Tom Master plumber logged in.
    (14:51:00) Tom Master plumber: Ok shoot
    (14:51:28) Peter Filias: When my washing machine empties into the washtub, the nearby toilet has recently (about the past four - five months) started to have big air bubbles come out of the toilet bowl, making a very loud bwoop bwoop bwoop sound. The bubbles are so large that they actually cause water to splash on the inside of the toilet lid.

    The bathroom sink next to the toilet already has one of those "chimney"vents, so I can't see air being trapped in there, but I'm no plumber.

    I've already snaked the house's vent PVC, and I've put industrial strength drain opener down all the nearby drains.
    (14:53:58) Tom Master plumber: You either have a filling septic tank or a clogging drain. Drain cleaners donít work. You should have the whole drain line snaked
    (14:54:17) Peter Filias: No septic.
    (14:54:27) Tom Master plumber: This kind of thing will get worse
    (14:54:37) Peter Filias: So what is the issue, do you think?
    (14:54:44) Peter Filias: What causes this?
    14:54
    (14:55:01) Tom Master plumber: then it is the drain line, have it cleaned all the way to the street
    (14:55:10) Peter Filias: expensive?
    (14:55:38) Tom Master plumber: It could be many things, greese build up or other build up
    (14:55:57) Peter Filias: Where would grease buildup come from? Emptying grease into the kitchen sink? And why doesn't the other toilet bubble?
    (14:55:59) Tom Master plumber: Some what yes
    (14:56:11) Peter Filias: Ok
    (14:56:33) Tom Master plumber: is the other toilet on the same level
    (14:56:37) Peter Filias: Yes
    (14:56:57) Tom Master plumber: how far away
    (14:57:02) Peter Filias: Across the house.
    (14:57:29) Tom Master plumber: then it may just be a clog in that branch
    (14:57:59) Tom Master plumber: A snake should be run from the toilet to the main drain
    (14:58:18) Tom Master plumber: the toilet will need to be removed
    (14:58:52) Peter Filias: Okay.
    14:59
    15:36
    (15:36:07) Peter Filias: That sucks. What range would plumbers charge for something like that, to drain to street?
    (15:37:05) Tom Master plumber: I'm Sorry I don't know what other plumbers charge for there work.
    (15:37:28) Tom Master plumber: we charge $98.00 per hour
    15:39
    (15:41:59) Peter Filias: Okay. How long COULD that take?
    (15:43:01) Tom Master plumber: from 1 hour, in most casses. But can be all day
    (15:43:23) Peter Filias: OUCH.
    (15:43:49) Tom Master plumber: I know
    (15:44:22) Peter Filias: So if the drain to the street is clogged, partially, when water empties from my washer into the washtub, the water then tries to drain to the street, where it sees resistance, sending "air" back to bubble through just the toiler?
    (15:44:26) Peter Filias: toilet?
    15:44
    (15:45:53) Tom Master plumber: the line starts to fill with water pushing air back up the vents and the toilet
    (15:46:17) Peter Filias: Okay. Would it seem odd that the same toilet we're speaking of needs to be plunged frequently.
    (15:46:20) Peter Filias: But rarely overflows.
    (15:46:26) Peter Filias: Just drains in a very peculiar fashion.
    (15:47:05) Tom Master plumber: no that would be consistent with a glog
    (15:47:26) Peter Filias: So a plumber will snake from my toilet (after it's removed) to the street, or can they do w/o removing it?
    15:49
    15:55
    (15:55:52) Tom Master plumber: yes if there is a clean out
    speedball1's Avatar
    speedball1 Posts: 29,301, Reputation: 1939
    Eternal Plumber
     
    #4

    Dec 1, 2005, 03:30 PM
    By "chimney vent"do you mean a mechanical vent and not a vent that goes through the roof? I'm not the Tom that you talked to. I'm not that fast on the draw to go in and pull a toilet and snake from the closet bend. That's only as a last result. Have you any idea what kind of a mess your bathroom would be in when you pull a 3/4" cable out of the sewer covered with black grease and all the nasty stuff your sewer contains? I don't hold a masters ticket but I've been a service manager for my firm in addition to running service calls and I would hesitate to put this plumber out on calls if his best shot is to pull the toilet and snake through the closet bend. You can come down the lavatory vent and get to the branch without pulling the toilet. If for some reason I couldn't go down the lavatory vent another way to reach the clog would be to go down the roof vent that services the laundry tray. this way would follow the water flow from the sink to the clog.
    As for the house sewer. By code we install a clean out on the sewer line to the street not over 18" from the foundation and brought up to grade. But it doesn't sound like it's out of the house. Could be, but doesn't sound like it.
    BeforeI go much farther tell me more about this "chimney" vent. Regards Tom
    pfilias's Avatar
    pfilias Posts: 4, Reputation: 1
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    #5

    Dec 1, 2005, 08:52 PM
    When I say "chimney" vent, I only mean a vent that is under my sink that looks like a chimney to me. I'm not talking about a vent that goes up through my house out of my roof.

    It was just something my friend helped me put under the bathroom sink last year to dry and get ride of some gurgling noises that were coming from the sink. I basically feel that this whole bathroom area has always had some sort of "venting" problem.

    I'd rather NOT snake out my drain to the street. You're right, the mess would be nasty!
    speedball1's Avatar
    speedball1 Posts: 29,301, Reputation: 1939
    Eternal Plumber
     
    #6

    Dec 2, 2005, 04:43 AM
    "When I say "chimney" vent, I only mean a vent that is under my sink that looks like a chimney to me. I'm not talking about a vent that goes up through my house out of my roof."

    What you have isn't called a "chimney vent" it's called a cheater vent, A AAV,(Air Admitence Vent) or by spring loaded mechanical vent in short a Studor Vent" If you're still in contact with this "Master Plumber" that gave you this "great advice" you might send him my post. You can tell him I'll be glad to put him out in a repair truck as a helper until he learns some of the basics. But from what he's told you I wouldn't put him out in the field by himself. This isn't arrogance speaking, it's fifty years experience. By the way, this toilet that fills to the top and just drains down leaving solids behind. I have one that most repair plumbers miss.. Look down at the bottom of the bowl. If there is a small hole, then that is a jet that starts the syphon action. If it's clogged the water will just swirl around and slowly go down leaving solids behind. Take your finger,(UGH!!) and run it around the inside of the opening. Over the years minerals build up and cut down on the syphon (flush) action. If it is rough or you feel build up, take a table knife and put a bend in it to get around the curve in the bowl and chip and scrap it clear. Next take a coathanger and clear out the holes around the rim. They start the swirling action. And last, check the water level in the tank. It should be 1/2" below the top of the over flow tube. And speaking of the overflow tube, Make sure the small 1/8" tube from the ballcock to the white overflow tube is connected so it discharges in it and that it's flowing when the ballcock fills. This is what raises the water level in the bowl. For a good solid flush they all have to work together. Cheers, Tom
    fredg's Avatar
    fredg Posts: 4,929, Reputation: 674
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    #7

    Dec 2, 2005, 04:48 AM
    Snake
    Hi,
    With all the other info added to your question, and you don't have a septic tank, but do have a sewage line going out to the main sewage line, your sewage line is stopped up.
    Over the years, grease and/or soap deposits buildup can become like "cement" in your sewage line.
    Snake it out.
    speedball1's Avatar
    speedball1 Posts: 29,301, Reputation: 1939
    Eternal Plumber
     
    #8

    Dec 2, 2005, 05:02 AM
    Fred, "you don't have a septic tank, but do have a sewage line going out to the main sewage line, your sewage line is stopped up."

    Sorry Fred, while your reasoning was sound you didn't go back and read his second post where he says he has another toilet on the same level that works fine. If the blockage were out in the sewer line it would affect the whole house. This sounds like it's in the branch from the laundry tray that hits a clog and sends a bubble back up the line and that's where I would focus my attention. Cheers,Tom
    mikefrommd's Avatar
    mikefrommd Posts: 2, Reputation: 1
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    #9

    Dec 11, 2005, 09:55 AM
    Toilet air bubbles
    My toilet has big air bubbles when the washing machine drains, similar to the other problem. In my case, the washer is one floor above the troubled toilet, almost directly above it. The toilet works fine, as do all the other toilets in the house. Any ideas?
    Thanks
    speedball1's Avatar
    speedball1 Posts: 29,301, Reputation: 1939
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    #10

    Dec 11, 2005, 10:20 AM
    Hey Mike,

    You have a partial clog in the drainage line that the washer discharges into and runs past your first floor toilet.. Let me explain what's happening. A washer pump discharges with great force , The discharge picks up more speed dropping down from the second floor, bangs into the partial clog in the line and starts to rebound back pushing a bubble of air ahead of it. This is what you see in the first floor toilet. Then, because it's not completely blocked the discharge drains away before anything overflows. This can only get worse. You're going to have to snake out the drain line.You can go at this from either the washer roof vent or the vent that vents the first floor toilet. Drop the cable down to the base and start to auger. Put out about 25 more feet of cable to be sure you get past the clog. Afterwards cycle the washer to test and flush out the line. Good luck, Tom
    mikefrommd's Avatar
    mikefrommd Posts: 2, Reputation: 1
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    #11

    Dec 11, 2005, 10:53 AM
    Thnaks Tom--that makes sense to me, although I'm not sure how I'll get that done because I can't get on the roof to the vent. I'll have to call a plumber I guess. Thanks again.
    pfilias's Avatar
    pfilias Posts: 4, Reputation: 1
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    #12

    Jan 20, 2008, 11:54 AM
    We solved our own problem. After spending 200-300 on plumbers, we found the problem to be TOO MUCH detergent in the washing machine!!
    joriet's Avatar
    joriet Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #13

    Dec 21, 2010, 10:38 AM
    My experience was roots in the sewer line. Whenever my toilet bubbles, I know the roots are coming back to haunt me and it's time to rent a sewer auger.
    speedball1's Avatar
    speedball1 Posts: 29,301, Reputation: 1939
    Eternal Plumber
     
    #14

    Jun 1, 2014, 09:35 AM
    My experience was roots in the sewer line.
    let me say that sooner or later you're going to have to bite the bullet and replace that old sewer line with PVC. If you wish to control roots RootX or Robics Foaming Root Killer that contain Dichlobrnic are two products you could try.
    A less expensive way would be to call around to garden supply stores and ask for fine grain Copper Sulphate. Put a 1/2 pound in your toilet and flush it down. Repeat in 6 months.
    [SIZE=2]Hope this helps and thank you for rating my answer, Tom[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2][/SIZE]

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