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    jkerich's Avatar
    jkerich Posts: 28, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #1

    Jun 25, 2018, 11:02 AM
    More question on Sewer Gate/Check Valve
    I am start a new thread because the old Sewer Get/Check Valve thread is from 2009. The problem is the same (City sewage line gets block causing sewage to come out the basement toilets and showers). This is the 3 time in 25 years at this address. The end townhouse added a check valve the second time this happened and home was not flooded. The plumber that did the work told the owner that the pipes were not "right" and he could not find the outside line. He had to snake a camera down the line from inside the house to find the "right" location and basically jackhammer through the basement floor and install it. My questions are as to inserting a valve.


    Questions
    1). Is that really the right way to do it? Or the laze way?
    2). Normally, where are the valves installed, inside or outside?
    3). If outside, can I dig the hole myself to save money? I hear that controller don't want that people doing that, but itís an idea. Someone of course would have to show somewhere to dig, so its probably not workable.
    4). Whatís the best valve to put in? Any brands/designs that are better to use? The owner is concerned what would happen if it go stuck closed because of sewage mud/junk after a backup or over time.
    5). What type of contractor should she look for: plumber, general contractor, or other type of person?
    massplumber2008's Avatar
    massplumber2008 Posts: 12,776, Reputation: 1210
    Senior Plumbing Expert
     
    #2

    Jun 25, 2018, 06:13 PM
    1) In areas subject to flooding or backflow conditions backwater valves (check valves) are important additions to the plumbing system

    2) Normally, inside. Inside usually allows easier access to the check valve should it need to be serviced or something gets hung up on the flapper. Outside installation could see the check valve feet below grade, so almost always better inside.

    3) See number 2

    4) Any backwater valve of appropriate size will do... pretty much all the same.

    5) Plumber, for sure!

    Best location will be just prior to where the pipe leaves the building near the main drain cleanout.

    Finally, a good plumber will install check valve and install an accessible box and extend the access to floor level so the check valve can be serviced easily.

    Mark
    talaniman's Avatar
    talaniman Posts: 53,857, Reputation: 10852
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    #3

    Jun 26, 2018, 10:14 AM
    Just to add you might want to check with your local sewer and sanitation district if this is a problem with more than a few of your neighbors, as I have actually lived in areas where very old sewer systems needed upgrading, and the city added the check valves themselves to all the homes. This was also the case in another home in another state I lived in where all the neighbors had the same problem that made a huge upgrade necessary after sewer back up from insufficient grading of home sewers to the mains. They added the check valves and accesses.

    Unfortunately many had already spent thousands to have it done by a contractor, so check it out first as maybe you save money. 3 times in 25 years ain't bad when you consider darn near every spring /summer. If the lady up the street hadn't told us she got tired and called the city we would never have known we all had the same issue. Check valves on sewer lines are essential in some areas and easy access is crucial for future maintenance.
    jkerich's Avatar
    jkerich Posts: 28, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #4

    Jul 13, 2018, 07:08 AM
    The Howard MD county is running the sewers and they don't want to spend any money if they have to. They haven't serviced the pipes in more them 20 years and the PR person was clear that you wound have to be flooded a lot before the homeowner should put one in. They never said they would do it for any reason. So it basically up to each homeowner if they want to install it.
    jkerich's Avatar
    jkerich Posts: 28, Reputation: 1
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    #5

    Jul 17, 2018, 06:40 PM
    Once a back flow valve is installed, what kind of maintenance does it require to avoid flapper issues or homeowner caused back ups? I.E. does the flapper get stuck or blocked over time.
    talaniman's Avatar
    talaniman Posts: 53,857, Reputation: 10852
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    #6

    Jul 18, 2018, 09:07 AM
    Anything could happen over time, but the maintenance is simple just a regular routine inspection. Here are some articles that may help explain things for you.

    Sewer Check Valve Or Backwater Valve For House Sewer Line

    This is a great one, which has the maintenance tips but it's dependent on which type of valve you use.

    https://www.a2gov.org/departments/en...aintenance.pdf

    CAUTION: When your whole-house check valve in engaged, sewage from the overloaded public sewer system cannot enter your house. However, this also means that wastewater cannot leave your house, via toilets or sinks, until the sewer system recovers.
    And

    Sewer Check Valves: The Keys To Proper Installation

    A few of these articles are from NY specifically, and should be noted that not all local/regional/ or state laws are the same. A qualified EXPERIENCED, licensed, bonded AND insured plumber will be aware of YOUR local laws. You won't save much doing your own digging, but you may save your back by letting them handle it. A conversation will lead to everything being explained to you and all your questions answered.

    Don't hesitate to talk to your neighbors. Don't hesitate to get more than one estimate either.
    jkerich's Avatar
    jkerich Posts: 28, Reputation: 1
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    #7

    Jul 27, 2018, 06:36 PM
    If the check valve is installed and the sewer does backup, how does the homeowner know there is a problem with the sewer? I assume the water will just back up into the house at the lowest point as more water is added by sinks, toilets, and showers until the problem is noticed by the homeowner.
    talaniman's Avatar
    talaniman Posts: 53,857, Reputation: 10852
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    #8

    Jul 27, 2018, 07:36 PM
    Basically you are right, but the purpose of the valve is to prevent sewage and water from the main sewer from backing up in the house, as explained in post #6. You still must adjust your habits and drain usage until the main sewer recovers.
    jkerich's Avatar
    jkerich Posts: 28, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #9

    Aug 31, 2018, 03:38 PM
    We just installed the check value in the basement. I am including 2 pictures. One shows the installation of the box before the cement was poured on top and the second is completed project. The 2 foot tube was not long enough so is ends 3 inched below the floor surface. Normally it is at or before the floor.

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    massplumber2008's Avatar
    massplumber2008 Posts: 12,776, Reputation: 1210
    Senior Plumbing Expert
     
    #10

    Sep 8, 2018, 03:18 PM
    Nicely done! Thank you for taking the time to come back and post pictures... will surely help someone in the future!

    Mark

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