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    altadata's Avatar
    altadata Posts: 8, Reputation: 1
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    #1

    Feb 10, 2009, 01:20 PM
    Hi
    I have 2 problems similar in nature.
    1) I need to install a Y fitting in a already existing 3 inch vertical pipe that runs from the basement floor up into the first floor.
    If I cut this pipe, how can I insert the Y fitting, since I cannot move the upper part or lower part of the pipe?

    2) I need to install a Y fitting into an already existing 3 inch horizontal pipe underneath the basement floor. If I cut this pipe, ow can I insert the Y fitting into the pipe, since I cannot move the left and right parts of the pipe?

    Thanks.


    Forgot to mention - all are plastic pipes.
    massplumber2008's Avatar
    massplumber2008 Posts: 12,818, Reputation: 1211
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    #2

    Feb 10, 2009, 05:30 PM
    Hi Altadalta:

    You will want to use SHIELDED CLAMPS in both cases... see picture.

    Here, you will install say 4" pieces of pipe into each end of the wye fittings and then measure the overall length of the fitting with pipes installed PLUS a 1/2" or so.

    Then lay that measurement out on the pipe to be cut and make the cuts using a reciprocating saw. Be careful to support the vertical pipe and the horizontal pipe properly as you make the cuts. Then slide the clamps over the pipe ends, install the rubber sleeves, FLIP the rubbers back on themselves (see picture), install the wye fitting with pipe and then FLIP the rubber sleeves back onto the pipe, slide the clamps into place and tighten the clamps well.

    Let me know if that made sense...

    MARK
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    altadata's Avatar
    altadata Posts: 8, Reputation: 1
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    #3

    Feb 10, 2009, 07:14 PM
    Are these code approved and
    Does Home Depot have them? If not, who has them?
    ballengerb1's Avatar
    ballengerb1 Posts: 27,379, Reputation: 2280
    Home Repair & Remodeling Expert
     
    #4

    Feb 10, 2009, 07:36 PM

    Yes and yes
    altadata's Avatar
    altadata Posts: 8, Reputation: 1
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    #5

    Feb 10, 2009, 08:54 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by massplumber2008 View Post
    Hi Altadalta:

    You will want to use SHIELDED CLAMPS in both cases...see picture.
    ....

    Let me know if that made sense...

    MARK
    Hi Mark
    In your post you need 2 of these couplings, one for each end.
    Why I cannot just use one: one end of the Y will slide onto the pipe, the other end will have the coupling. When doing so the distance between the 2 ends that need coupling is about 1.5 inch ( the amount the Y slided into the pipe ).
    Would this still be OK and code safe?
    Thx.
    massplumber2008's Avatar
    massplumber2008 Posts: 12,818, Reputation: 1211
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    #6

    Feb 11, 2009, 05:30 AM
    If there is enough flexibility in the pipe.. side to side... then you should be able to use only 1 clamp... ;)

    Good luck!

    MARK
    altadata's Avatar
    altadata Posts: 8, Reputation: 1
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    #7

    Feb 11, 2009, 09:07 AM
    One possibility if to have a gap of the size of the sleeve and then cut a small piece of pipe to insert in that gap. Then put the coupling in top of that. Would this be OK?

    Thanks.
    massplumber2008's Avatar
    massplumber2008 Posts: 12,818, Reputation: 1211
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    #8

    Feb 11, 2009, 01:56 PM
    I'm unclear on what you are suggesting...

    Stick with one or two clamps... depending on flex in pipe. There should be no reason to get creative here... this is the right way to do it... ;)

    MARK
    ballengerb1's Avatar
    ballengerb1 Posts: 27,379, Reputation: 2280
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    #9

    Feb 11, 2009, 02:06 PM

    Alta, stick with Mark and don't try to creat that floating section you describe, you will have a leak and no structural stability.
    altadata's Avatar
    altadata Posts: 8, Reputation: 1
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    #10

    Feb 12, 2009, 02:58 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by ballengerb1 View Post
    Alta, stick with Mark and don't try to creat that floating section you describe, you will have a leak and no structural stability.
    Maybe I was not understood.
    I meant to put the repair coupling anyway, like in this picture.
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    ballengerb1's Avatar
    ballengerb1 Posts: 27,379, Reputation: 2280
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    #11

    Feb 12, 2009, 03:02 PM

    Your coupling is out of proportion in that picture, you have it almost twice its true length compared to the diameter. Remove 1/4 of the blue on both left and right and you will start to see there isn't that much hanging onto the two pipe ends.
    altadata's Avatar
    altadata Posts: 8, Reputation: 1
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    #12

    Feb 13, 2009, 01:31 PM
    I tried last night to practice with a 3 inch fitting and a spare 3 inch pipe.
    I did not use any glue of course.
    Putting the 3 inch fitting into a 3 inch pipe or viceversa is not easy. It just doesn't slide in easily.
    Do you have any advice how to easily slide it into the sleeve?

    I can slide it just maybe 1/4 of the total sleeve you can slide in into. The only way to slide it fully was to apply force with a malet at one end. Is that OK?

    The pipe that I'm trying to cut and change is in a very narrow place - not too much room and the length that is exposed is about 2-3 feet.
    I need to cut it at both ends and insert 2 fittings ( 3 inch diameter ) then insert 1 repair coupling.
    I don't think I have enough space for 2 repair coupling.

    So the best that I can do is to have a gap under the coupling ( I estimate the gap will be about 1/2 of the sleeve size, if I don't fully insert the pipe into the sleeve at the other end ).
    Would that be code safe?

    Thx.
    massplumber2008's Avatar
    massplumber2008 Posts: 12,818, Reputation: 1211
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    #13

    Feb 13, 2009, 05:45 PM
    ALtadata...

    Dry-fit is always a BITC*! When you are ready to prime/cement the pipe to the fitting it will slide on easy.

    In terms of clamps and space needed... all will depend on just how much side-to-side flexibility the plumbing stack has once you cut into the stack.

    Here, you want to plan on increasing the measurement/gap that extra 1/2" I mentioned (12" = 12.5") which will accommodate the ribs on each clamp and allow some room for crooked cut... and then make the first cut in the stack.

    If you have flexibility in the stack then you install the rubber sleeve onto the pipe, fold the rubber sleeve back on itself, prime/cement the pipe/fitting into place and then move pipe into position so you can flip the rubber sleeve onto pipe and clamp it all up.

    If no flexibility in the stack then you may need to increase the gap to 3/4"... or more (since you indicate you don't have the room to fit two clamps). If this is the case then I would suggest that you purchase a 4 band husky clamp (available only at a plumbing supply house) as in my picture below. These husky clamps have 4 bands, are longer and work great on plastic to plastic connections... may be good here IF no flexibility in the stack... ;)

    Don't forget that the SS bands/clamp can be installed after the pipe/rubber sleeve is installed by undoing the clamp and installing after all is in place.

    Finally, I'll bet there is flexibility. Plan for worst case by purchasing the two different clamp types mentioned and then make that first cut...that determines everything!

    Let me know if this is clear...

    MARK
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