Ask Experts Questions for FREE Help !
Ask
    nmwaldron's Avatar
    nmwaldron Posts: 17, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #1

    Jul 27, 2005, 07:47 PM
    Installing new bathtub and fixtures...
    Hi
    My wife and I just began ripping out our old bathtub to put in a new one. We decided we would also like new faucettes etc. I disconnected the hot and cold taps but the shower pipe will not come loose. Is this a soldered pipe? It appears to have a nut on it but I can't get it loose at all.
    Any help is much appreciated.
    Thanks
    Nathan
    kp2171's Avatar
    kp2171 Posts: 5,318, Reputation: 1612
    Uber Member
     
    #2

    Jul 27, 2005, 08:27 PM
    The showerhead shouldn't be soldered... it should screw onto the nipple. Is this what you are trying to remove? The fixture?

    I don't do plumbing for a living, so I cannot speak for all situations... but I've only seen fixtures screwed onto a threaded nipple which in turn is threaded on the other end and fits into a female 90 degree fitting.

    I'm sure somebody more experienced can clarify this.

    Absolutely no access to the back side of the wall?
    darrel1953's Avatar
    darrel1953 Posts: 86, Reputation: 12
    Junior Member
     
    #3

    Jul 27, 2005, 08:31 PM
    Time out
    It sounds like itís a good time to get out the open mesh sand cloth and clean around where the shower pipe enters the valve. Even if it has threads it could be soldered in there. Itís not the standard way to do things but some plumbers do that. The 2 ways to be sure what it is (iron or copper) is size and color. Once you have it clean if it is copper it will be a bright copper color. What plumbers refer to as 1/2" is the inside diameter. It actually measures 5/8" outside diameter whereas 1/2" galvanized iron pipe will be even larger than 5/8" o. d. because it is thicker. When it comes to deciding whether the threads have solder on them or not you really need to clean it and look in there. If you really can't move it heat it up with a torch. As long as you know what you are doing it can't hurt. Then again if you donít know what youíre doing, stop now and get help. I don't want you to ruin your valve or burn your house down. By the way are you really considering replacing the shower valve or just the handles and stems?
    Very few faucets will accept another faucet makers parts so you really need to know who the manufacturer is if you are going to replace parts as opposed to replacing the entire valve, in which case the manufacturer of the first valve won't matter. You may want to go to this site and read a bit.
    http://www.plumbinglessons.com/sup/showervalve.htm
    nmwaldron's Avatar
    nmwaldron Posts: 17, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #4

    Jul 27, 2005, 08:40 PM
    Thanks for your replies

    I'm pretty sure the shower pipe is copper. It has the same kind of connection as the hot and cold water connections but on the hot and cold connections there is a nut that threads to the old faucet connections, the shower pipe does not have this. This is a pretty old bathtub and pretty old faucets. I need to disconnect from the shower pipe so that I can remove the old faucets and replace them with the new.

    Hope that makes sense...

    Nathan
    speedball1's Avatar
    speedball1 Posts: 29,301, Reputation: 1939
    Eternal Plumber
     
    #5

    Jul 28, 2005, 06:14 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by nmwaldron
    Hi
    My wife and I just began ripping out our old bathtub to put in a new one. We decided we would also like new faucettes etc. I disconnected the hot and cold taps but the shower pipe will not come loose. Is this a soldered pipe? It appears to have a nut on it but I can't get it loose at all.
    Any help is much appreciated.
    Thanks
    Nathan
    Hi Nathan,
    By "shower pipe" are you referring to the curved chrome piece that comes out of the wall and connects to the shower head, (the goose neck or shower arm) or are you referring to the copper shower raiser that runs from the shower valve inside the wall up to a threaded drop eared ell that the shower arm connects to? Can you take a picture and attach it to your post?
    Regards, Tom
    nmwaldron's Avatar
    nmwaldron Posts: 17, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #6

    Jul 28, 2005, 07:42 AM
    Hi
    I mean the copper pipe that runs down the inside of the wall and connects to the back of the faucet.
    I actually removed it by heating it up with a blow torch, it wasn't soldered as far as I can tell. Now I just have to figure out how to get the pipe back up through the wall when I install the new fixtures!
    Thanks for the help,
    Nathan
    speedball1's Avatar
    speedball1 Posts: 29,301, Reputation: 1939
    Eternal Plumber
     
    #7

    Jul 28, 2005, 11:45 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by nmwaldron
    Hi
    I mean the copper pipe that runs down the inside of the wall and connects to the back of the faucet.
    I actually removed it by heating it up with a blow torch, it wasn't soldered as far as I can tell. Now I just have to figure out how to get the pipe back up through the wall when I install the new fixtures!
    Thanks for the help,
    Nathan

    Then it would indeed be the shower raiser that feeds the chrome shower arm that connects to the shower head. They are indeed soldered if they are copper. If they are galvanized then they are threaded.
    I wish you would have contacted me before tearing everything out. When we change out a tub and shower valve we leave the raiser, shower arm and head intact. We then use a coupling to connect the old raiser to the new valve. Unless you want your shower head to float and not be secured when you reinstall it you're going to have to install a 1/2" drop eared ell soldered on the raiser and secured by wood screws on backing. The shower raiser will then be soldered into the valve. The shower arm may then be screwed into the drop eared ell. Good luck, Tom
    nmwaldron's Avatar
    nmwaldron Posts: 17, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #8

    Jul 28, 2005, 12:42 PM
    Hi
    I tried leaving the shower head on but the shower raiser would not come loose from the faucet fittings. The only way I could get it to come loose was to take off the shower head and arm so that the raiser could turn as I loosened it.

    I'm taking the bathtub apart right now with a sledge hammer... the tub is one of those old 500lb cast iron ones... fun fun fun! :)

    Thanks for your time

    Nathan

Not your question? Ask your question View similar questions

 

Question Tools Search this Question
Search this Question:

Advanced Search

Add your answer here.


Check out some similar questions!

New Bath & Shower Fixtures [ 2 Answers ]

I had a new shower/bath area built and plumbed quite some time ago. I have finished tiling and an ready to have the shower nozzle, hot/cold knobs, and bath faucet installed. I was just told the pipes that were installed must match the brand of fixture. Is this right? I have no idea what the...

Replacing bathtub and shower fixtures [ 4 Answers ]

(1) When replacing bathtub "snout", shower controls etc.. Do you caulk around the fixtures or use plumbers puddy? The original installation had plumbers puddy. (2) Do you place the caulk so the fixtures "sqeeze" out some material or just inside the fixtures? Example: I've obtain some...

Installing a bathtub on a concrete slab [ 3 Answers ]

I have a toilet in the basement with proper vent. I want to add a bathtub near the toilet. After I jackhammer up the concrete and install the tub trap and drainage into the toilet drain, how do I seal the floor under the tub? The outside part is open and it should be easy to pour concrete mix and...

Tub won't drain, other fixtures are fine... [ 5 Answers ]

We've a full bath (combo shower/tub, lav and toilet) where the tub either does not drain at all, or will take 48 hours to finally go down (when aided by chemicals I know I should not be using). The lav and toilet have no flush/drain problems, so I'm not thinking it's a bad vent situation... could...

Installing a bathtub on a concrete slab [ 1 Answers ]

I am installing a tub to existing plumbing, but it's on a concrete slab. We've jackhammered the concrete so that I have enough room underneath to put in the drain and p-trap, but am I going to have to buy the tub, set it in place, hook up the plumbing and then remove it to replace the concrete?


View more questions Search