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    drojas37's Avatar
    drojas37 Posts: 5, Reputation: 1
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    #1

    Apr 30, 2019, 05:26 PM
    If you wrap a piece of cotton cloth around a thermometer will temp. rise?
    The options are
    A. Yes because cloth is an insulator of heat
    B. No because cloth is a conductor of heat
    C. Yes because the cloth gets warmer
    D. No because thermometer doesn't generate heat on its own
    Wondergirl's Avatar
    Wondergirl Posts: 37,761, Reputation: 5426
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    #2

    Apr 30, 2019, 05:28 PM
    Try it. Science is understood best by experimenting.
    drojas37's Avatar
    drojas37 Posts: 5, Reputation: 1
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    #3

    Apr 30, 2019, 05:43 PM
    Well ik if it's a fur coat it would keep it insulated so No. but for a cotton cloth I'd assume the same right? The only thing is I don't know WHY and I cant try it because my thermometer has no batteries
    Wondergirl's Avatar
    Wondergirl Posts: 37,761, Reputation: 5426
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    #4

    Apr 30, 2019, 05:54 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by drojas37 View Post
    Well ik if it's a fur coat it would keep it insulated so No. but for a cotton cloth I'd assume the same right? The only thing is I don't know WHY and I cant try it because my thermometer has no batteries
    Goggle this. What kind of thermometer?
    drojas37's Avatar
    drojas37 Posts: 5, Reputation: 1
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    #5

    Apr 30, 2019, 06:00 PM
    Just a reg. thermometer it doesn't specify. I looked up the law of thermodynamics and I believe it might b D but if you have a thermometer around could u try for me please? Thank uuu :}}}
    drojas37's Avatar
    drojas37 Posts: 5, Reputation: 1
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    #6

    Apr 30, 2019, 06:38 PM
    There's no pic attached to the question but I'd assume either would be fine :]
    ma0641's Avatar
    ma0641 Posts: 15,681, Reputation: 1012
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    #7

    May 1, 2019, 11:36 AM
    The only change, according to the first law of thermodynamics, conservation of energy, is when something else makes it change. If the cotton is at the same temperature as the thermometer, what will happen? If hotter? If colder? Rub your hands together. Where did the heat come from? The rise in the temperature of your hand is dependent on the amount of friction generated by rubbing your hands. Nothing changed, mechanical energy was changed to heat. Now, you should be able to answer your own question!

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