Ask Experts Questions for FREE Help !
Ask
    CliffARobinson's Avatar
    CliffARobinson Posts: 1,416, Reputation: 101
    Ultra Member
     
    #1

    Oct 19, 2011, 02:24 PM
    Do you think Activities for Toddlers should include TV Viewing?
    A question from our site blog.

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), released a policy statement regarding the using of television and "electronic media" to entertain or educate young children. They state that even though video programs are marketed as "educational" for toddlers and younger aged children, in reality, studies have shown that only children older than two can generally understand context and the subject matter.

    They suggest one on one unstructured play rather than using television. What do you think? What do you do?
    Wondergirl's Avatar
    Wondergirl Posts: 37,894, Reputation: 5430
    Jobs & Parenting Expert
     
    #2

    Oct 19, 2011, 02:38 PM
    An emphatic no!

    What I did was read to my children, made up stories with them, had them help me make desserts and meals (it's amazing what little kids in highchairs or plopped atop countertops can do to help), together figured out what we needed at the grocery store, wrote grocery lists with them, took them grocery shopping, played simple games with them, taught them how to behave in public, put together jigsaw puzzles with them, spent hours and hours outdoors in our big back yard. I did allow Sesame Street and Mr. Rogers into our house and a few Saturday morning cartoons.

    We need to institute classes for future parents. Maybe even licensing.
    DoulaLC's Avatar
    DoulaLC Posts: 10,488, Reputation: 1952
    Uber Member
     
    #3

    Oct 19, 2011, 04:52 PM
    I think they can be used productively, for short amounts of time, with parental involvement as Wondergirl said. Otherwise, no.

    Had a similar discussion this afternoon with parents at a conference. They had decided to limit video games for their son to no more than half an hour. Have also discussed this with fellow educators.

    In the last number of years we have seen a very obvious decrease in social skills, and an increase in the need for instant gratification and almost constant entertainment. Even many toys these days seem to require little imagination or ingenuity. You push a button and watch it go. Oh Boy!

    As you mentioned, while deemed educational, they will never take the place of verbal interaction with family members. Too often television becomes a babysitter, with the child plopped down in front of it.

    Here's an interesting article regarding older kids and too much time in front of one screen or another:

    Video games 'can alter children's brains' - Telegraph
    CliffARobinson's Avatar
    CliffARobinson Posts: 1,416, Reputation: 101
    Ultra Member
     
    #4

    Oct 19, 2011, 04:58 PM
    I agree with both of you, while the news report this question is based on deals with children younger than two, you both raise an interesting point about the instant gratification and unavailability of challenging tasks, games and toys to stimulate the mind for kids through all stages of development.
    jenniepepsi's Avatar
    jenniepepsi Posts: 4,042, Reputation: 533
    Ultra Member
     
    #5

    Oct 19, 2011, 05:36 PM
    Well when my daughter was a baby, she did have some time with the TV. But it certainly wasn't a baby sitter or teacher. Mostly it was musical pictures (like disneys fantasia, or baby einstien videos) that she could watch while I was cooking over the stove. Most other times she was on me in a carry wrap anyway.

    Now, she is 8 and she loves her cartoons. But it is not the ONLY thing she does. And most of her cartoons she likes are not very educational (like spongebob!) but she does like some of the good ones, like dragon tales, caillou, etc.

    TV is fine. As long as it is in moderation.
    JoeCanada76's Avatar
    JoeCanada76 Posts: 6,669, Reputation: 1707
    Uber Member
     
    #6

    Oct 19, 2011, 11:12 PM
    I do not think Television is considered an activity at all for children.
    Will admit that there are shows my son likes to watch but he is not glued nor do we let him sit there. He is very active and would rather be outside playing in the park or riding his bike or going for picnics. Helping mama and papa with making meals and desserts , etc... It is so much better having them involved in real activities.

    Moderation is key, and Study came out that showed that kids who watch spongebob, that their iq is lowered after watching that show. Forget where I saw that in. Caillou is one of my sons favorite but we nipped that one in the bud too. Caillou is always whiny about something. Good example, not. Lloll...
    QLP's Avatar
    QLP Posts: 980, Reputation: 656
    Senior Member
     
    #7

    Oct 23, 2011, 02:36 AM
    Sesame street used to be on in England just after lunch when my children were small. It was our nice post-lunch rest time when we all snuggled up on the couch to watch it. My son loved to count with 'the count'. Then he used to look for the numbers on the TV remote. It was how he first showed his love of numbers that saw him go on to specialise in maths later in life leading to his present job in finance. When he started nursery school at aged 3 his teacher was amazed when he sat on her knee and counted to a hundred one day. When she reported her surprise to me I said, 'well if you are short of time you could always ask him to count in fives or tens next time.' She thought I was joking but I wasn't. I nurtured his love of maths, first brought to my attention through watching TV together, throughout his school life. Until it got too hard for me... :( Although even at university he would ask for my help with his 'holiday homework' and I would sit bamboozled while he would outline a problem that was so far over my head it was somewhere in the stratosphere. Then after outlining it to me he would somehow work out what he was stuck with and I would get a cheery, 'thanks mum!' Lol.

    Using a TV as a babysitter at the expense of more valuable activities I don't endorse, but some well chosen programmes, preferably shared with an adult the kids can chat with, during quiet time, can have their place in my opnion.

Not your question? Ask your question View similar questions

 

Question Tools Search this Question
Search this Question:

Advanced Search

Add your answer here.


Check out some similar questions!

Toddlers crying for no reason? [ 2 Answers ]

My son cries when we visit relatives or friends. As soon as we walk into peoples houses the crying begans and he immideatley wants to go home a begans to walk towards the door. His crying doesn't stop with anything until we get in the car and he sees we're going home. His crying is very annoying...

Toddlers and Tiaras [ 17 Answers ]

Toddlers and Tiaras. Have you ever seen the show? It's about kids in beauty pageants and their parents. What do you think about child beauty pageants? Good, bad, indifferent? Personally, I don't understand why. These kids wear fake teeth, hair, some parents even get fake tans for...

Toddlers health [ 4 Answers ]

My daughter is two years old and has on and off diarrhea for the past year. She sometimes will go two to three weeks before it clears up. We have tested for everything and all shows up negative. Any advice?

Blood in toddlers stool [ 1 Answers ]

My toddler had diarrhea about 30 minutes ago. She had a small accident in her pants before she could make it to the bathroom. In her pants, it looks like the diarrhea may have been bloody. What could be the cause, and does she need to go to the ER tonight, or the doctor first thing in the morning?

Toddlers and Funerals [ 1 Answers ]

My brothers father in law passed away in a traffic accident last night. He and his wife have a 3 year old girl. My brother is torn between wanting to go along with his wife and mother in laws wishes about having his daughter present for ALL aspects of the preparations, visitations and the funeral,...


View more questions Search