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    Callybelle's Avatar
    Callybelle Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #1

    Jan 19, 2010, 12:49 PM
    Am I considered a veteran
    I survived boot camp and a few weeks of medical training and got out of the Army, am I considered a veteran?
    tickle's Avatar
    tickle Posts: 23,800, Reputation: 2674
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    #2

    Jan 19, 2010, 01:09 PM

    Yes, boot camp is tough. Medical training is good. Why did you give up ? You could have had a decent profession out of army training.

    In order for you to be considered a veteran, you would only have had to see at least one day of active duty abroad.

    Tick
    tickle's Avatar
    tickle Posts: 23,800, Reputation: 2674
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    #3

    Jan 31, 2010, 09:46 AM

    This is from Military.Com regarding eligibility for veterans pension

    Veteran's Pensions Eligibility:

    You may be eligible if:

    * you were discharged from service under other than dishonorable conditions, AND
    * you served 90 days or more of active duty with at least 1 day during a period of war time. However, 38 CFR 3.12a requires that anyone who enlists after 9/7/80 generally has to serve at least 24 months or the full period for which a person was called or ordered to active duty in order to receive any benefits based on that period of service. With the advent of the Gulf War on 8/2/90 (and still not ended by Congress to this day), veterans can now serve after 9/7/80 during a period of war time. When they do, they generally now must serve 24 months to be eligible for pension or any other benefit. But note the exclusions in 38 CFR 3.12(d), AND
    * you are permanently and totally disabled, or are age 65 or older, AND
    * your countable family income is below a yearly limit set by law

    STG's disagree is incorrect.

    Tick
    STG's Avatar
    STG Posts: 84, Reputation: 7
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    #4

    Jan 31, 2010, 10:18 AM
    Tickle, there's nothing in your cited material that indicates that service abroad is required to be considered a veteran. Let's review, shall we?

    Veteran's Pensions Eligibility:
    There is a difference between receiving a pension and being a veteran. I served for many years in the US Army. I'm a veteran, but I'm not drawing retirement pay.


    * you were discharged from service under other than dishonorable conditions, AND
    This means that you received a discharge under honorable, general or medical conditions... not a dishonorable discharge.

    * you served 90 days or more of active duty with at least 1 day during a period of war time. However, 38 CFR 3.12a requires that anyone who enlists after 9/7/80 generally has to serve at least 24 months or the full period for which a person was called or ordered to active duty in order to receive any benefits based on that period of service. With the advent of the Gulf War on 8/2/90 (and still not ended by Congress to this day), veterans can now serve after 9/7/80 during a period of war time. When they do, they generally now must serve 24 months to be eligible for pension or any other benefit. But note the exclusions in 38 CFR 3.12(d), AND
    Note the text in bold. This doesn't require service abroad... only during time of war. This means that the soldier manning a post at Fort Lewis (WA) on 9/1/90 is just as eligible as the soldier manning a tank in Kuwait on the same day.

    Read your own cited material, Tickle. You're way off base and you remain incorrect.
    tickle's Avatar
    tickle Posts: 23,800, Reputation: 2674
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    #5

    Jan 31, 2010, 10:40 AM

    Hi STG, then pull up a website from the government that proves my information incorrect. Because from your information every tom or harry that enlisted, stayed for boot camp, opted to not carry on a commitment, quit, can collect a pension.


    Ms tickle
    Fr_Chuck's Avatar
    Fr_Chuck Posts: 81,302, Reputation: 7692
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    #6

    Jan 31, 2010, 11:39 AM

    It is all a matter of what you want a "veteran" to be.

    You have enough service to join the VFW or the American Legion if you want, and they are veteran groups.

    You are not a vet of a war since you did not serve in a war zone at any time.

    Since you did not want to serve in the military ( you left after or during training) why do you care what you can be called.

    As a person who served, while training is tough, you really did not do any service to the nation by actually performing any military duties. So to real vets, they would not really see you as one, since you were in, if you want to call yourself one , you can.
    STG's Avatar
    STG Posts: 84, Reputation: 7
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    #7

    Feb 3, 2010, 02:46 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by tickle View Post
    hi STG, then pull up a website from the government that proves my information incorrect. Because from your information every tom or harry that enlisted, stayed for boot camp, opted to not carry on a commitment, quit, can collect a pension.

    ms tickle
    "Tickle," there's no need for me to pull up yet another website... the site you cited already showed the accuracy of my statement.

    As Fr Chuck stated, there's a difference between drawing a veterans pension (due to disability and/or war service) and being someone who is simply a veteran of the armed forces. A trainee who dropped out in basic training is a veteran, albeit not one I'd respect.

    However, a person who served his or her time during peacetime is still a veteran. He or she may not be eligible for a pension - but they're still a veteran who served the nation.

    STG
    wendee008's Avatar
    wendee008 Posts: 4, Reputation: 1
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    #8

    Jun 18, 2010, 02:27 PM

    YES. You might even be eligible for veterans benefits! A veteran simply served in the miiitary. The length of service, type of service or type of discharge doesn't negate the fact that a veteran is a veteran is a veteran.
    PaulforAll's Avatar
    PaulforAll Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #9

    Dec 29, 2011, 03:50 PM
    Can one simply drop out of basic training. It is my understanding that you are required to serve otherwise you would be dis-honorably discharged.
    okweeb's Avatar
    okweeb Posts: 9, Reputation: 2
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    #10

    Mar 12, 2012, 02:20 AM
    Did the Vet/soldier complete 180 days of military service? Does he have a DD 214 that states he was honorably discharged (wether or not he completed his training, if so, I don't see how that happened) He never states how or why he got out of the Army, he can best answer his own query by looking at his DD 214.
    leonelovelessjr's Avatar
    leonelovelessjr Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #11

    Sep 4, 2012, 04:56 PM
    I finished basic training as well as AIT. Got into some trouble and was discharged under honorable conditions. I do not have my dd214 it was lost in a moving box. I never truly considered myself a veteran because I didn't do my full service but only nine months. I regret not being able to fulfill my duties. I respect and honor all of our soldiers as well as our veterans. God Bless Them all.
    Chrisstro6992's Avatar
    Chrisstro6992 Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #12

    Sep 28, 2012, 09:37 AM
    ALCON,

    I am a Veteran Representative at an unemployment office. The main thing about being considered a VET is this, you have to have time in the military which has to be 90 days or greater on Title 10 orders for other than training. Going to BASIC or AIT does not put you into a category as a VET. You do not have go into a combat zone to be considered a VET either. You could get orders to work at a base or a fort as long as it is not training and be considered a VET.
    tamgunny's Avatar
    tamgunny Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #13

    Feb 2, 2013, 08:13 AM
    I was in for a short time, boot then classes. My mother decided she couldn't handle my brother and went to the congressman and some how got me out on a regular discharge. I wanted to stay. But I wouldn't have my great family ( husband, daughter and son-in law, who is in the air force) now.
    Portos247's Avatar
    Portos247 Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #14

    Jun 16, 2013, 06:57 AM
    I'm in a similar boat. I was in the National Guard for 5 months before going to boot camp. Once there, the heat kept making me pass out and puke at times. They put me in discharge platoon. I was in it for a month before they gave me a medical discharge. My DD 214 states "Refrat and discharge from Reserve of the Army Para 5-11 Ar 635-200 Did not meet procurement Medical fitness standings - No disability". I'm wondering if I qualify for a VA loan. This happened during Desert Storm time. They said if I couldn't stand the Texas heat, I sure could stand the heat over there and they can't have a guy that others can't depend on. I don't blame them. I wouldn't want to be in the line of fire and my buddy passes out on me. But I still wonder if I qualify for benefits.

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