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    notcoolenough's Avatar
    notcoolenough Posts: 95, Reputation: 7
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    #1

    Mar 21, 2012, 05:22 PM
    How do stores get away with selling counterfeit hair care products?
    This has been bugging me for quite some time and I cannot find the answer. Stores OBVIOUSLY know their products are fake, they sell it anyway, and they don't get in trouble. How is this not regulated in some way? Most of the bottles even say IF NOT BOUGHT AT A SALON, THEN THIS IS FAKE (paraphrasing here).

    Can someone enlighten me?
    Alty's Avatar
    Alty Posts: 28,318, Reputation: 5972
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    #2

    Mar 21, 2012, 05:29 PM
    It's not fake, it's a reproduction. That doesn't mean that the products don't work, it just means that they're not attaching the name of the salon product to this product, and let's face it, a lot of people buy just because of the name, even if another product is just as good.

    Many salons sell products that are only available in the salons. So, when you buy at a store they have to tell you that this product is not the same one that you buy from the salon, but that doesn't make it fake in any way. Not at all.
    notcoolenough's Avatar
    notcoolenough Posts: 95, Reputation: 7
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    #3

    Mar 21, 2012, 05:32 PM
    SO what is up with he Paul Mitchell plea on TV? He says the products are counterfeit.
    Alty's Avatar
    Alty Posts: 28,318, Reputation: 5972
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    #4

    Mar 21, 2012, 05:40 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by notcoolenough View Post
    SO what is up with he Paul Mitchell plea on TV? He says the products are counterfeit.
    They're not his products, or so he claims. They shouldn't have his name on them, I agree, but, unless they're claiming that they are his products, which they clearly aren't, and you even state that in your question, the public is aware that they're not getting Paul Mitchell. Or they should be aware, just by reading the bottle.

    I've bought Paul Mitchell brand shampoo in a drug store (it was a reproduction), and at the hair dresser (it was the real thing). The only difference between the two was that one cost $9 and the other cost $45. Other then that, it did exactly what the name brand shampoo did for my hair. There was absolutely no difference whatsoever, other than price.

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