Ask Experts Questions for FREE Help !
Ask
    steff2's Avatar
    steff2 Posts: 4, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #1

    Aug 22, 2013, 08:39 AM
    Is my 3 year old advanced or gifted?
    My son is 3 years and 4 months old. He said his first word: "Hi" at 6 months old. At 9 months, he took his first steps. At 1 year old, he was saying a lot of words, By 1 1/2 he was joining 2 words together and saying the names of family members including aunts and uncles. By 2, he was talking in sentences. At 3 years and 2 months he could write all the upper case letters, at 3 years and 3 months, I let him listen to a phonics song 4 times in the car, and in the evening, he had mastered almost all the letter sounds. In a weeks time, he was reading 3 letter words. A few weeks ago, he asked me how to write lowercase letters, he learned very quickly and would keep practicing until he got the letters right. Now, he knows how to write all the uppercase and lowercase letters. This week, he asked me to teach him numbers and in 3 days, he learned to write the number 1 to 10 by himself. He can also write his name: first and last and spell it out. He is in junior nursery and is ahead of all his classmates. He learns very quickly and when he want to learn to write something new, he would keep practicing how to do it on a board or drawing it in the air. He also would answer his workbook in school even if most of the lessons haven't been taught yet. He speaks very well too and when he was placed in a toddler class last year with the junior nursery, he was excitedly socializing with the older kids and raising his hand during the class discussions and sitting still in class. He gets along well with kids of all ages. I am wondering if he is just a quick learner or is there a possibility he is gifted.
    joypulv's Avatar
    joypulv Posts: 21,593, Reputation: 2941
    current pert
     
    #2

    Aug 22, 2013, 08:59 AM
    He sounds very bright, and all that matters is that he is loved and encouraged and given good chances as he grows to be creative, inquisitive, and active. Good school systems, public or private, certainly do count for a lot too.

    The world is full of adults who were precocious, gifted kids. Many of them lament the attention heaped on them as children, along with the expectations. Many of them 'evened out' academically by the time they were teens, and were a disappointment to themselves and everyone around them. Some exceptions do exist of course, such as in the arts and in things like chess, or even in academics overall.

    So congratulations on a bright and eager and sociable child, and on good parenting.
    steff2's Avatar
    steff2 Posts: 4, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #3

    Aug 22, 2013, 08:59 AM
    I would like to add that my son also stood up in his crib at 6 1/2 months, first rode a bike with training wheels before his 2nd birthday and could maneuver it quite well by the next day, he also learned to swim by his 6th lesson when he was 2 years and 10 months old.
    Wondergirl's Avatar
    Wondergirl Posts: 37,831, Reputation: 5427
    Jobs & Parenting Expert
     
    #4

    Aug 22, 2013, 09:00 AM
    It's possible, but right now is the time to focus on helping him become a whole person.

    Expose him to all sorts of experiences such as story time at the library and picking out books, grocery shopping with you (after putting together a grocery list with you), going on walks and identifying flowers and trees and birds and observing how people interact, helping you in the kitchen with simple chores (I'd safely set my child up on the countertop or at the table and allow him to dump pre-measured ingredients or crack eggs into the mixing bowl when I made cookies or brownies), helping you clean house (lots of little jobs he can do), listening to all kinds of music and learning what genre a piece belongs to, and so on.

    Of course, it goes without saying that you and he socialize in all sorts of ways with other moms (and dads) and children. And sit on the floor and play with him with his little cars -- build garages out of blocks and roads out of printer paper and pretend and enthuse and enjoy. Play school with stuffed animals as the "class."

    Read to him and change your voice for the different characters -- and especially read classic children's poems such as Robert Louis Stevenson's "The Swing" ("How do you like to go up in a swing, Up in the air so blue?") and stories such as "The Elephant's Child" by Rudyard Kipling ("the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River, all set about with fever-trees"). Your children's librarians will be excited to help you find good read-aloud books, stories, and poems.

    Involve all his senses -- touch, hearing, tasting, smelling, seeing -- as you interact with him. And the best thing my parents subtly taught me was to be patient with others who weren't as quick at learning as I was.
    joypulv's Avatar
    joypulv Posts: 21,593, Reputation: 2941
    current pert
     
    #5

    Aug 22, 2013, 09:05 AM
    WOW, I still can recite Stevenson, which we learned in the first grade, and that was 61 years ago. I liked poetry then and do now.
    In winter I get up at night, and dress by yellow candlelight.
    In summer, quite the other way, I have to go to bed by day.
    steff2's Avatar
    steff2 Posts: 4, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #6

    Aug 22, 2013, 09:09 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by joypulv View Post
    He sounds very bright, and all that matters is that he is loved and encouraged and given good chances as he grows to be creative, inquisitive, and active. Good school systems, public or private, certainly do count for a lot too.

    The world is full of adults who were precocious, gifted kids. Many of them lament the attention heaped on them as children, along with the expectations. Many of them 'evened out' academically by the time they were teens, and were a disappointment to themselves and everyone around them. Some exceptions do exist of course, such as in the arts and in things like chess, or even in academics overall.

    So congratulations on a bright and eager and sociable child, and on good parenting.
    Thank you for your quick reply. I don't want to pressure him, but he seems very excited to learn and keeps asking questions why and asking me to teach him new things. He has older siblings too and he wants to do everything they are doing. :-)
    steff2's Avatar
    steff2 Posts: 4, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #7

    Aug 22, 2013, 09:12 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by Wondergirl View Post
    It's possible, but right now is the time to focus on helping him become a whole person.

    Expose him to all sorts of experiences such as story time at the library and picking out books, grocery shopping with you (after putting together a grocery list with you), going on walks and identifying flowers and trees and birds and observing how people interact, helping you in the kitchen with simple chores (I'd safely set my child up on the countertop or at the table and allow him to dump pre-measured ingredients or crack eggs into the mixing bowl when I made cookies or brownies), helping you clean house (lots of little jobs he can do), listening to all kinds of music and learning what genre a piece belongs to, and so on.

    Of course, it goes without saying that you and he socialize in all sorts of ways with other moms (and dads) and children. And sit on the floor and play with him with his little cars -- build garages out of blocks and roads out of printer paper and pretend and enthuse and enjoy. Play school with stuffed animals as the "class."

    Read to him and change your voice for the different characters -- and especially read classic children's poems such as Robert Louis Stevenson's "The Swing" ("How do you like to go up in a swing, Up in the air so blue?") and stories such as "The Elephant's Child" by Rudyard Kipling ("the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River, all set about with fever-trees"). Your children's librarians will be excited to help you find good read-aloud books, stories, and poems.

    Involve all his senses -- touch, hearing, tasting, smelling, seeing -- as you interact with him. And the best thing my parents subtly taught me was to be patient with others who weren't as quick at learning as I was.
    Thank you for all your great suggestions. :-)
    Wondergirl's Avatar
    Wondergirl Posts: 37,831, Reputation: 5427
    Jobs & Parenting Expert
     
    #8

    Aug 22, 2013, 09:13 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by steff2 View Post
    Thank you for all your great suggestions. :-)
    I have more. :)

Not your question? Ask your question View similar questions

 

Question Tools Search this Question
Search this Question:

Advanced Search

Add your answer here.


Check out some similar questions!

Gifted 5 year old? [ 3 Answers ]

I have always been a little concerned about my son's development. He started speaking in full sentences by the time he was a year and a half old. He said his first word "Dad" at around 6 months and was walking by the time he was 1. Since he has been in school, his various teachers and I have...

Gifted 2-year old? [ 2 Answers ]

I am wondering if I can get some opinions on whether my son may be gifted. He is 25 months old. Since infancy, we have had the feeling that our son was a little different. As a baby, he slept very little, was colicky, and seemed extraordinarily alert and sensitive. In short, he was high...

Gifted one year old [ 4 Answers ]

Is my 16 months old gifted? If yes, what do I need to do? - Ability to sit still and watch his favorite video by 3 months - Able to read and pick words when ask on flash card by 6 months - Sign more, eat, milk, daddy, water and follows directions like donít touch and please come back by 9...

5 year old child, is he gifted? [ 10 Answers ]

I have a son who is 5 , he can read books especially the car magazines and he has learnt about cars independently mostly without my help and he knows almost all the cars that are in magazine. I happen to see that he has already finished his lessons, he knows poems, stories without seeing the books....

Do you think my 5 year is gifted [ 11 Answers ]

Are you able to tell me if this is Asperger of Giftness Traits? My 5 year always been different since birth. Never slept through the night, very fussy, very picky with eat at birth. But now he's 5 years old and he's *Very demanding *Impatience *Emotionally sensitive *Curious of...


View more questions Search