Ask Experts Questions for FREE Help !
Ask
    Mopay's Avatar
    Mopay Posts: 2, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #1

    Mar 7, 2014, 02:33 PM
    Which pole makes dc volts?
    I am developing electrical cells and was wondering whether the positive or the negative pole makes the dc volts.
    Curlyben's Avatar
    Curlyben Posts: 18,464, Reputation: 1857
    Admin & Wine Expert
     
    #2

    Mar 7, 2014, 02:44 PM
    Neither
    smoothy's Avatar
    smoothy Posts: 25,495, Reputation: 2853
    Uber Member
     
    #3

    Mar 7, 2014, 03:37 PM
    You might want to clarify that question a bit. Which school of theory are you subscribing to. Current flow or voltage flow... they are opposite from each other.
    Mopay's Avatar
    Mopay Posts: 2, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #4

    Mar 7, 2014, 04:54 PM
    When I change the copper to sterling silver or gold, the volts go up and no change in mA. When I change the copper back in the positive side and change aluminum to zinc, the mA go up. There is a difference and I was wondering if anyone had addressed this before. I looked around the net but could not find anyone testing this.
    smoothy's Avatar
    smoothy Posts: 25,495, Reputation: 2853
    Uber Member
     
    #5

    Mar 7, 2014, 05:21 PM
    THen what you are dealing with is not what pole the electricity comes from and goes to... what you are dealing with are the properties of different materials when use in a battery cell.
    ebaines's Avatar
    ebaines Posts: 12,129, Reputation: 1307
    Expert
     
    #6

    Mar 8, 2014, 06:33 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by smoothy View Post
    You might want to clarify that question a bit. Which school of theory are you subscribing to. Current flow or voltage flow... they are opposite from each other.
    Sorry, but voltage doesn't "flow."

    To the OP: a voltaic cell, or a galvanic cell as it is also called, yields DC voltage between the two poles (anode and cathode). The level of voltage that it produces is dependent on the chemistry of the cell: the materials used for anode and cathode and the electrolyte. The current it produces depends on the circuit you connect it to - you can use V=iR to calculate current 'i' for a simple resistance circuit. The max current the cell is capable of producing depends on the physical size of the cell and its components. Hope this helps.
    smoothy's Avatar
    smoothy Posts: 25,495, Reputation: 2853
    Uber Member
     
    #7

    Mar 8, 2014, 03:07 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by ebaines View Post
    Sorry, but voltage doesn't "flow."

    To the OP: a voltaic cell, or a galvanic cell as it is also called, yields DC voltage between the two poles (anode and cathode). The level of voltage that it produces is dependent on the chemistry of the cell: the materials used for anode and cathode and the electrolyte. The current it produces depends on the circuit you connect it to - you can use V=iR to calculate current 'i' for a simple resistance circuit. The max current the cell is capable of producing depends on the physical size of the cell and its components. Hope this helps.
    I know that it doesn't literally. Common convention is that electriciy flows from positive to the negative... but in reality electrons are what flow... which have a negative charge and as such go from the negative to the positive poles.

    If you look at their follow-up answer it appears they have been trying different anode and cathode materials and are seeing different votages as would be expected.

Not your question? Ask your question View similar questions

 

Question Tools Search this Question
Search this Question:

Advanced Search

Add your answer here.


Check out some similar questions!

Will changing water heater element from 220 volts to 120 volts lower the wattage use [ 10 Answers ]

If I change the voltage on my 3800 watt water heater element from 220 volts to 120 volts wiill it now heat at 1/2 the watts or 1900 watts? I have solar panels and want to slow heat the water during the day and with the proper electrical equipment be able to turn the 220 volts back on should I...

Wall mount A/C, 110 volts vs 220 volts? [ 9 Answers ]

I live an an 580sq ft apartment, & I know some of the other tenants have 220 volt A/C, & some have 110 volt A/C. Which is better & Why?? :confused:

Is equipment cheaper to run on 480 VOLTS OR 220 VOLTS 3 phase [ 1 Answers ]

I have 2 refrigeration compressors. One 5 h.p. 480 volts, 3 phase @ 4.5 amps. One 5 h.p. 230 volts 3 phase @ 20 amps. Which one will cost less to run assuming electric costs are same?


View more questions Search