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    alathief's Avatar
    alathief Posts: 3, Reputation: 1
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    #1

    May 4, 2008, 03:48 AM
    Does cremation increase Carbon levels
    Does cremation (burning) of dead bodies increase the carbon in the atmosphere and speeds up the greenhouse effect? Shouldn't we bury the dead so that at least the decomposition will feed the earth?
    templelane's Avatar
    templelane Posts: 1,177, Reputation: 227
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    #2

    May 4, 2008, 04:09 AM
    The major worry from cremation is actually heavy metals form things like people's fillings being released into the atmosphere. The problems with burial is we are fastely running out of space to put people and the creation of graveyards and the way people are buried is not an 100% ecologically friendly solution either.

    Have a read of this for a good summary of the ecological issues for both.
    Cremation or Burial  Carbon Emissions and the Environment - lower your carbon footprint

    Personally I don't know which method is the most environmentally friendly, I have never found any evidence to sway me definatively to one side. I do believe that some people are beginning to investigate and create more environmentally friendly burials.

    I don't know how big a percentage of pollution cremation contributes but it is probably very small compaired to industry, cars, deforestation, cows and rice farming.

    Here is some interesting reading you might like
    Crematorium concern over carbon footprint becomes a burning issue | Environment | The Guardian
    JimGunther's Avatar
    JimGunther Posts: 436, Reputation: 38
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    #3

    Jul 28, 2008, 10:25 AM
    In addition to the above, burning of virtually any substance in the atmosphere produces carbon, of course there is a big debate as to what effect this is having on the environment. One volanco eruption can put more carbon into the air than years of burning things.
    Fr_Chuck's Avatar
    Fr_Chuck Posts: 81,302, Reputation: 7692
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    #4

    Jul 28, 2008, 10:37 AM
    Of course one has to look at the exhaust using #3 diesel from the backhoe that digs the grave, The motors and exhaust of the equipment to make the casket and the vault. And in today's vault the body does not go back into the ground really,

    Add to that the line of cars driving miles to get to the grave site.
    WVHiflyer's Avatar
    WVHiflyer Posts: 384, Reputation: 34
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    #5

    Jul 28, 2008, 11:51 PM
    Cremation has to have a smaller footprint. Besides all the things FrChuck mentioned, there's the mining and smelting of the metals for the casket, and the processes that make the cloth linings (I don't know but I bet they don't use natural fibers). And the bodies don't fertilize (can't f/ inside coffin unless it's wood or cardboard but those prod have own carbon probs).

    Cremation releases carbon, and there is still the prob of cars to mausoleum or grave site for some.

    'Course now I've spouted off, I'll have to check that site temp posted...

    -
    asking's Avatar
    asking Posts: 2,673, Reputation: 660
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    #6

    Jul 30, 2008, 08:54 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by JimGunther
    In addition to the above, burning of virtually any substance in the atmosphere produces carbon, of course there is a big debate as to what effect this is having on the environment. One volanco eruption can put more carbon into the air than years of burning things.
    Wikipedia says the opposite, that volcanos today are a very small source of carbon dioxide gas.

    In the modern era, emissions to the atmosphere from volcanoes are only about 1% of emissions from human sources.[12][13]
    Greenhouse gas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The main source for this assertion (13) is a paper by a volcanologist with the USGS, the United States Geological Survey, a generally very reputable source of scientific information.

    According to a pie chart at Wikipedia, the largest single source of carbon dioxide is power stations, followed by industry, and then transportation fuels (e.g. gasoline, diesel, jet fuel).
    JimGunther's Avatar
    JimGunther Posts: 436, Reputation: 38
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    #7

    Jul 31, 2008, 05:51 AM
    I didn't say that volcanoes put more carbon into the air than man, only that they can. Of course the big vocanoes don't happen very often-thank God! But when the caldera under Yellowstone National Park, to name one, erupts, as it has in the past, the carbon and other emmissions will have world-wide catastropic consequences.
    WVHiflyer's Avatar
    WVHiflyer Posts: 384, Reputation: 34
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    #8

    Jul 31, 2008, 06:20 PM
    When opne of those mega volcanoes blows, the carbon emissions will be the least of our worries.
    JimGunther's Avatar
    JimGunther Posts: 436, Reputation: 38
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    #9

    Jul 31, 2008, 06:22 PM
    Well You Got That Right!! There have been a few documentaries on the subject and it is really shocking...
    Derri's Avatar
    Derri Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #10

    Dec 8, 2011, 03:29 AM
    Body liquefaction... is the best option... can say A Greener Way To Die... this technique.. is running in USA.. as a trial... for getting response... better than cremation
    toshiraw20's Avatar
    toshiraw20 Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #11

    Feb 18, 2013, 05:36 AM
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