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    InkRedAble's Avatar
    InkRedAble Posts: 25, Reputation: 1
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    #1

    Feb 11, 2012, 05:55 PM
    No fire to the plugs.. 92 honda prelude s 2.2
    I replaced the coil and the distributor, I'm still not getting anything to the spark plugs.. I've tried everything.. Really need some advice so I can have my car back.
    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 16,756, Reputation: 5596
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    #2

    Feb 11, 2012, 06:11 PM
    If the CEL comes on for 2 seconds and then goes out, when the ignition switch is turned to ON (Position II), then the problem is likely with the distributor. Usually, replacing the Ignition Control Module (ICM) inside the distributor solves the problem. Be sure to apply silicone heat transfer grease to the back of the new ICM.
    InkRedAble's Avatar
    InkRedAble Posts: 25, Reputation: 1
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    #3

    Feb 12, 2012, 12:25 PM
    What is the CEL? Where is the icm?
    InkRedAble's Avatar
    InkRedAble Posts: 25, Reputation: 1
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    #4

    Feb 12, 2012, 01:27 PM
    I'm not getting any light from the blue wire inside the dizzy. I don't know what todo
    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 16,756, Reputation: 5596
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    #5

    Feb 12, 2012, 01:29 PM
    Check Engine Light (CEL)

    The ICM is located inside the distributor:

    Ignition Control Module (ICM or Igniter) and Coil Replacement

    Bench testing ICMs and coils is virtually useless. It does not come close to simulating the extreme heat that often causes these components to fail. I recommend replacing these critical and problematic components every 120,000 miles or 10 years, whichever comes first.


    1. Disconnect negative battery cable, recording any radio codes first.

    2. Remove hex-head machine screws (3), securing distributor cap to housing, using an 8mm nut driver.

    3. Move distributor cap and wires off to the side.

    4. Remove machine screw securing rotor to shaft, using a precision #2 Phillips head screwdriver. A 1/4-inch drive magnetic bit holder (e.g. Wiha 52650) with a #2 Phillips head bit works really well. It may be necessary to "hit" the starter once or twice, in order to rotate rotor for access to mounting screw.

    5. Remove rotor and leak cover.

    6. Unfasten ICM wires, remove coil mounting screws (on distributors with a coil inside), and set coil aside. Trick: Removing the coil first, on distributors with a coil inside, improves access to the ICM.

    7. Remove both screws securing heat sink to housing, using a precision #2 Phillips head screwdriver.

    8. Remove heat sink from distributor and unfasten both screws mounting ICM to heat sink, using a precision #2 Phillips head screwdriver.

    9. Clean connections with #240 abrasive cloth or steel wool.

    10. Coat the back of the new ICM (or old ICM, if reusing) with a thin, even coat of silicone heat transfer compound. This special silicone grease increases heat transfer to the heat sink. Failure to apply silicone heat transfer compound will cause the ICM to quickly fail. Arctic Silver 5 is recommended by an AMHD member, which is available at Radio Shack.

    If the ICM and the heat sink are simply placed together, the small air gaps (insulator) that naturally exist between them will inhibit heat transfer. By filling these gaps, the compound allows a direct path through which heat can travel. Failure to apply this grease is one reason why some Hondas suddenly die. Attention to detail makes a big difference with modern day electronics.

    11. Mount ICM to heat sink and reinstall ICM, ICM terminal wires, coil, coil wires, leak cover, rotor, and distributor cap. Ensure female ICM connectors fit snugly--crimp with pliers, if necessary.


    Conceptually, the ICM is a large output transistor (switch) controlling current through the primary coil. ICMs replace points and condenser in older vehicles. In the primary coil, current builds to 5 to 12 amps, generating lots of heat (due to inductance). Then, the ECM controls when the ICM "switches off" current to the primary coil, causing amperage to go to zero. When this happens, 12 to 14 volts in the primary coil is "stepped-up" to 30,000 volts in the secondary coil. This process creates a "type" of alternating current required for the coil (step-up transformer) to work. In a properly working ICM, timing is precisely when needed to fire each spark plug.

    Bottom Line: ICMs and coils take a beating.

    Note: Distributor cap contacts can oxidize or corrode, creating high secondary resistance, which can result in rotor and ICM failure, reduced mileage, CEL coming on, catalytic converter failure, or failed emissions test. The secondary ignition system will destroy the ICM and coil, if you do not properly maintain the ignition system. This means replacing the distributor cap, rotor, and spark plug wires every 60,000 miles.

    WARNING: Intermittent ICM failure can allow fuel to build-up in the exhaust system. Detonation can then blow the exhaust system off the vehicle.
    InkRedAble's Avatar
    InkRedAble Posts: 25, Reputation: 1
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    #6

    Feb 12, 2012, 02:58 PM
    My CEL stays on it does not go off... I changed the dizzy and the coil, still won't start> the only thing it could be are those plugs that go from the coil to the dizzy to the spark plugs.. does that sound right? Sorry I'm kind of sort of new at this, and I appreciate your help!
    odinn7's Avatar
    odinn7 Posts: 7,691, Reputation: 1547
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    #7

    Feb 12, 2012, 03:20 PM
    Have you checked the timing belt?
    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 16,756, Reputation: 5596
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    #8

    Feb 12, 2012, 03:22 PM
    When you turn the ignition switch to ON (Position II), does the Check Engine Light (CEL) come on and then go off after 2 seconds? If not, the problem is with the ACG (ALT) (S) fuse, in the under dash fuse/relay box; ECM (perform the K-Test, below); main relay; or the ignition switch. Perform tests in that order. I'd recommend that you test all under dash and under hood fuses with a test light or multimeter.

    The K-Test: Remove the MAP Sensor connector and turn the ignition switch to ON (Position II). Using a multi-meter, check for 5 volts going between the MAP Sensor connector's reference wire (+) and ground. As you look at the connector, this is the socket on the right. Really press the black test lead into a cleaned main ECM ground on the thermostat housing. If the voltage is low, it's probably indicating ECM failure. Most failed ECMs will record a fraction of a volt. To me, the K-Test is simple, elegant, and accurate.

    In most of these situations, the ECM has failed. If this is warranted by the K-Test, shop for a new ECM based on price and warranty.
    InkRedAble's Avatar
    InkRedAble Posts: 25, Reputation: 1
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    #9

    Feb 12, 2012, 03:57 PM
    Checked all the fuses are good I think maybe we just got a bad coil. So were going to get another one and try it if not.. pick-a-part! Lol jking ill figure it out sooner or later thanks for your help.. timing belt is fine.
    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 16,756, Reputation: 5596
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    #10

    Feb 12, 2012, 04:17 PM
    A bad coil doesn't explain the CEL staying on--focus on the ECM.
    InkRedAble's Avatar
    InkRedAble Posts: 25, Reputation: 1
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    #11

    Feb 12, 2012, 06:10 PM
    I'm having a hard time figuring this out...
    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 16,756, Reputation: 5596
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    #12

    Feb 12, 2012, 06:20 PM
    How can that be? I gave you everything to isolate the problem. Don't make it harder than it is.

    Did you run the K-Test?
    InkRedAble's Avatar
    InkRedAble Posts: 25, Reputation: 1
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    #13

    Feb 12, 2012, 06:26 PM
    I don't see any positive or ground wires running to the MAP
    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 16,756, Reputation: 5596
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    #14

    Feb 12, 2012, 06:30 PM
    There aren't. Just remove the electrical connector going to the MAP Sensor. Red multimeter test probe going to the female connector on the right, black test probe going to any ground on the engine. With the ignition switch turned on, what DC voltage do you read?
    InkRedAble's Avatar
    InkRedAble Posts: 25, Reputation: 1
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    #15

    Feb 13, 2012, 03:50 PM
    .003
    InkRedAble's Avatar
    InkRedAble Posts: 25, Reputation: 1
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    #16

    Feb 13, 2012, 03:51 PM
    The first wire one the left reads .040/middle-.003/right-.003
    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 16,756, Reputation: 5596
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    #17

    Feb 13, 2012, 03:58 PM
    Yes, your ECM is totally shot.
    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 16,756, Reputation: 5596
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    #18

    Feb 13, 2012, 04:00 PM
    Here's how to easily replace the ECM:

    Engine Control Module (ECM) Replacement

    1. Disconnect negative battery cable, after recording radio codes.

    2. Remove right door sill molding, pull carpet back, and expose ECM.

    3. Remove three 10mm bolts and one 10mm nut securing ECM cover.

    4. Separate ECM cover from harness carefully.

    5. Press connector release, going to connectors A, B, and D, and carefully pry connectors from ECM, using a small screwdriver.

    6. Spray connectors with WD-40, plug connectors into new ECM, and button things up.

    Be sure to get an exact Honda Part No. match, which you'll get off the old ECM.
    InkRedAble's Avatar
    InkRedAble Posts: 25, Reputation: 1
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    #19

    Feb 13, 2012, 04:11 PM
    Thanks for all your help buddy!
    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 16,756, Reputation: 5596
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    #20

    Feb 13, 2012, 05:47 PM
    Just give me an update, after you install the new ECM.

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