Ask Experts Questions for FREE Help !
Ask
    Xoiii's Avatar
    Xoiii Posts: 3, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #1

    Sep 29, 2008, 07:11 PM
    Body Cavity
    Why is it a good thing to have a body cavity?
    ISneezeFunny's Avatar
    ISneezeFunny Posts: 4,175, Reputation: 821
    Ultra Member
     
    #2

    Sep 29, 2008, 07:34 PM

    ... I'm assuming by "body cavity" you mean the mouth, ears, nose, anus?

    Easiest way to explain is... it allows easier access to things that we cannot ourselves obtain through our skin, such as food, water, etc. And it also makes it easier for us to expel waste.

    If we didn't have any of these body cavities, we would have to absorb all the nutrition we need via our skin, which would mostly be through endo/exocytosis. This takes too much energy, and can only support small cells/organisms. Can you imagine having to consume our daily requirement of nutrition through your skin?
    Xoiii's Avatar
    Xoiii Posts: 3, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #3

    Sep 29, 2008, 07:40 PM

    Ah... yes! That make a lot of sense! Thank you so much for helping me :)
    asking's Avatar
    asking Posts: 2,673, Reputation: 660
    Ultra Member
     
    #4

    Oct 2, 2008, 01:32 PM

    Are you sure they aren't asking about the value of the coelom?
    Xoiii's Avatar
    Xoiii Posts: 3, Reputation: 1
    New Member
     
    #5

    Oct 4, 2008, 08:39 PM

    I'm not sure... What would it be if they were asking about the value of the coelom?
    Liasdaughter's Avatar
    Liasdaughter Posts: 54, Reputation: 4
    Junior Member
     
    #6

    Nov 24, 2008, 11:23 PM
    We also need body cavities for our internal organs, so they will not be squashed !

    While the cranial cavity houses the brain, and the vertebral or spinal cavity the spinal cord; the most crowded, I guess, would be the Abdominopelvic cavity, containing the stomach, intestines, spleen, liver, bladders, reproductive organs, even the rectum, and some others.

    Also, the Thoracic cavity (pleural part for lungs, mediastinum part for the heart (pericardial cavity) and some place left for the oesophagus, trachea, etc, offers even some protection (ribs, muscles, pleura) for the incased organs.

    Yeah, it's definitely a good thing to have body cavities.
    :)
    Clough's Avatar
    Clough Posts: 26,678, Reputation: 1649
    Uber Member
     
    #7

    Nov 25, 2008, 04:10 AM

    For more information, please see that which can be found via clicking on the following link.

    Body cavity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Thanks!
    asking's Avatar
    asking Posts: 2,673, Reputation: 660
    Ultra Member
     
    #8

    Nov 25, 2008, 08:37 AM

    The primary protection for the organs in most animals is the skeleton, the ribs and other bones of the "endo"skeleton in vertebrates, the exoskeleton in arthropods. The fluid inside a coelom also provides modest resistance to squashing.

    The coelom is a separation from the wall of the body, enclosed by a thin layer of membrane tissue. Inside this separate space--which is walled off from the ribs, hip bones, and muscles of the body wall-- is the intestinal tract and most of the organs of the body. Each organ is usually enclosed in its own thin, slippery membrane, so that the organs slip easily past one another inside the coelomic space when an animal (humans included) moves. After major surgery, scar tissue and "adhesions" can sometimes form, causing different organs or parts of organs to stick to one another.
    Liasdaughter's Avatar
    Liasdaughter Posts: 54, Reputation: 4
    Junior Member
     
    #9

    Nov 25, 2008, 05:44 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by Liasdaughter View Post
    We also need body cavities for our internal organs, so they will not be squashed !

    While the cranial cavity houses the brain, and the vertebral or spinal cavity the spinal cord; the most crowded, I guess, would be the Abdominopelvic cavity, containing the stomach, intestines, spleen, liver, bladders, reproductive organs, even the rectum, and some others.

    Also, the Thoracic cavity (pleural part for lungs, mediastinum part for the heart (pericardial cavity) and some place left for the oesophagus, trachea, etc, offers even some protection (ribs, muscles, pleura) for the incased organs.

    Yeah, it's definitely a good thing to have body cavities.
    :)
    ================================================== =======
    Sorry, I made a mistake, by leaving one important word, "toghether", out:

    We also need body cavities for our internal organs, so they will not be squashed TOGETHER !
    ================================================== =======

    "Some advantages of having a true coelom...more space for complex organs and organ systems..."

    Answer to 2

    or Mader, Biology: Student Edition, eighth edition, Chapter 30.

    ================================================== =======

    "The outer chest wall (thorax) is formed by 12 pairs of curved ribs, which join the sternum (breastbone) anteriorly and the thoracic vertabrae (backbone) posteriorly.

    The rib cage provides bony protection for the lungs and heart."

    Sherwood, Lauralee, 2005, Fundamentals of physiology: Chapter 12, p. 368, 3rd ed.
    Publisher Thomson Brooks/Cole.

    ================================================== ========

    My sincere thank you for each and all of you for your kind comments ! Regards: Liasdaughter

Not your question? Ask your question View similar questions

 

Question Tools Search this Question
Search this Question:

Advanced Search

Add your answer here.


Check out some similar questions!

First cavity! [ 8 Answers ]

I have my first cavity and I have to get it filled in a couple of days. The problem is that I am scared to death of needles and they have to give me one that numbs my mouth. I'm serious when I said scared; I would fight the dentist or do anything to get that needle away from me. To take shots at...

Cavity wall insulation [ 1 Answers ]

Can you use cavity wall insulation on a house with a suspended timber floor which as a crawl space, want happen to the air vents:) will it become damp? Thanks crewe

Wiring in cavity wall [ 9 Answers ]

I'm going to running wire within a twelve inch wide concrete cavity wall. The exterior concrete faces are two inches wide, with each face having two inches of polyiso insulation bonded to it. So eight inches are used up. The middle four inches is where the wiring will go. Plastic outlet boxes are...


View more questions Search