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    nykkyo's Avatar
    nykkyo Posts: 132, Reputation: 1
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    #1

    Sep 7, 2013, 10:39 PM
    What happens
    When we receive light from remote ibjects beyond 14 GYs? Referring to the CMB is a non-sequitar --- CMB is inconsistent with thermodynamis. The measured temperatures are a result of many heat souces in the last 14GYs. It is impossible to assign a temperature to a specific heat sourece: especially since the BBT claims there is no center to expansion and the lacations of the heat souces are unknown.
    ebaines's Avatar
    ebaines Posts: 12,129, Reputation: 1307
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    #2

    Sep 9, 2013, 07:33 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by nykko
    What happens...when we receive light from remote objects beyond 14 GYs
    We don't - the furthest object ever observed (to date) is about 13.4 billion light years away. At that distance the red shift factor is 11.9, meaning:



    See List of the most distant astronomical objects - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Quote Originally Posted by nykko
    CMB is inconsistent with thermodynamis. The measured temperatures are a result of many heat souces in the last 14GYs. It is impossible to assign a temperature to a specific heat sourece: especially since the BBT claims there is no center to expansion and the lacations of the heat souces are unknown.
    You're thinking in three dimensions, and assumng that the Big Bang is like a grenade going off in a room - the heat from the explosion form an exploding grenade would be seen as centered on the point of detonation. But in cosmology the concept of an expanding universe has no center - in our 3D world every place is the center. Consequently the 3-degree background radiation is seen to be emanating from all directions. If you believe the CMB is from individual point sources, what would those point sources be?
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    nykkyo Posts: 132, Reputation: 1
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    #3

    Sep 9, 2013, 03:49 PM
    [QUOTE=ebaines;3547130]We don't - the furthest object ever observed (to date) is about 13.4 billion light years away. At that distance the red shift factor is 11.9, meaning:



    See List of the most distant astronomical objects - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Supernovae, black holes,GRBs,etc. stratified through time. It is not necessary to postulate time as a fourth dimension: I can represent an event as a scalar. For ease with calculatin the interval between events a complex plane can be utilized where time is the imaginay ordinate; thus using simple algebra. Multiple dimensions are objects for using arcane and obfuscating mathematics. Instead of multiple dimensions coordinates are just functional parameters. The BBT is metaphysical nonsense. It has nothing to do with religion; but is an attempt to circumvent ridiculous claims relative to origin of the universe. Ultimately the question reduces to
    "from where did the fist-cause come".
    ebaines's Avatar
    ebaines Posts: 12,129, Reputation: 1307
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    #4

    Sep 10, 2013, 09:01 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by nykkyo View Post
    The BBT is metaphysical nonsense. It has nothing to do with religion; but is an attempt to circumvent rediculous claims relative to origin of the universe. Ultimately the question reduces to
    "from where did the fist-cause come".
    The Big Bang Theory does not attempt to address that question. It only adresses the state of the universe starting approximately 10^-43 seconds after the presumed singularity. It does not attempt to address what existed at T=0, or before.

    Your original question was about objects further than 14GLY away and I pointed out that none have ever been observed - do you think the distances listed in the article I referenced are incorrect? If you think the BBT is nonsense then you need some other explanation for the uniformity of the CMB and the Hubble Constant.

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