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    ta2man's Avatar
    ta2man Posts: 2, Reputation: 1
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    #1

    Dec 27, 2007, 08:45 PM
    220v dryer plug different than 220v wall outlet
    Dryer has 2 flat and 1 round prong, outlet has 3 flat prongs. Is there an adapter for that? Also do they make a 220v extension cord or a two into one adapter for a 220v?
    KISS's Avatar
    KISS Posts: 12,510, Reputation: 839
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    #2

    Dec 27, 2007, 10:21 PM
    Can you identify the plugs on the following chart?:

    StayOnline.com - NEMA Plug & Receptacle Configurations Reference Chart (Straight Blade)

    The dryer plug is probably a NEMA 6-15.
    oneguyinohio's Avatar
    oneguyinohio Posts: 1,302, Reputation: 196
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    #3

    Dec 27, 2007, 10:33 PM
    Your best bet is to have the outlet rewired to match the plug on the dryer. That way, you won't have to worry about overheating any cords... You should be able to find what you need at a home supply center. Of course, an electrician is a good idea depending on your experience... for safety purposes...
    MOWERMAN2468's Avatar
    MOWERMAN2468 Posts: 3,214, Reputation: 243
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    #4

    Dec 28, 2007, 06:28 AM
    You could have the receptacle outlet, or the "pigtail" on the dryer changed to where the two would match. I would probably go with the pigtail, and retain the old pigtail in case you run into that situation again somewhere else.
    labman's Avatar
    labman Posts: 10,580, Reputation: 551
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    #5

    Dec 28, 2007, 09:54 AM
    The first thing to do is compare the nameplate rating of the dryer to the breaker and wire feeding the circuit. They make different plugs to keep you from plugging in a higher amp load into a lower amp outlet. If you have the wire to support the dryer, just change the outlet. #10 wire will only handle 30 amps.
    MOWERMAN2468's Avatar
    MOWERMAN2468 Posts: 3,214, Reputation: 243
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    #6

    Dec 28, 2007, 04:12 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by labman
    The first thing to do is compare the nameplate rating of the dryer to the breaker and wire feeding the circuit. They make different plugs to keep you from plugging in a higher amp load into a lower amp outlet. If you have the wire to support the dryer, just change the outlet. #10 wire will only handle 30 amps.
    Doesn't most dryers us a double 30 amp breaker? If you have a 30 amp breaker, you have the wire needed to support the dryer.
    Fr_Chuck's Avatar
    Fr_Chuck Posts: 81,302, Reputation: 7692
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    #7

    Dec 28, 2007, 05:55 PM
    "MOST" do but then they may have the few that are not.

    But there are several types of plugs used on dryers, If you bought it new, you should have been specific as to the plug that you needed, Normally if you draw the store the picture of what it looks like, they will supply you a new power cord for the dryer.
    RichardBondMan's Avatar
    RichardBondMan Posts: 832, Reputation: 66
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    #8

    Dec 28, 2007, 06:11 PM
    Don't change the outlet, just buy the appropriate "pigtail" (dryer cord with blades that fit your receptacle on the wall), hook the cord to the dryer then plug into the wall receptacle). You can find the appropriate cord at most appliance stores, stores like Lowe's, Home Depot. Draw a rough diagram of your wall outlet's receptable and carry it with you.
    labman's Avatar
    labman Posts: 10,580, Reputation: 551
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    #9

    Dec 28, 2007, 08:30 PM
    The same stores carry a selection of outlets too. The price of copper being what it is today, I suspect the outlet will be much cheaper and just as easy or easier to change.

    Nobody has touched on the extension cord and the 2 into 1 adapter. Even if you found an extension cord that would fit it, running a dryer on one very long is a bad idea. If you aren't going to put the dryer where its cord will reach the outlet, you are going to have to run cable to a new outlet. You want to run something else on the same circuit? Likely you can set 2 outlets and plug them both in. It is just like a 120 volt circuit. It isn't what all you have plugged in at once, it is what is turned on at once.
    MOWERMAN2468's Avatar
    MOWERMAN2468 Posts: 3,214, Reputation: 243
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    #10

    Dec 31, 2007, 11:41 AM
    labman posted:
    If you aren't going to put the dryer where its cord will reach the outlet, you are going to have to run cable to a new outlet. You want to run something else on the same circuit? Likely you can set 2 outlets and plug them both in. It is just like a 120 volt circuit. It isn't what all you have plugged in at once, it is what is turned on at once.



    To start with, you CAN NOT run a 220volt wire to run multiple outlets. This is in violation of national electrical codes. You are even required now in our county to run a separate 110 volt outlet for a refrigerator, microwave, computer, or freezer, this is in our area, and is only 110 volts. Now back to the 220 volt issue, DO NOT put more than one outlet on each 220 volt breaker. Also, remember that if you move the dryer, you also have to have the dryer vented to the outside as venting underneath a home can be a fire hazard, seeing as how dryer lint is highly flammable.
    And as for it doesn't matter what you have hooked up it matters what is on, can be true, but common sense would tell you not to plug in more items on one circuit than what the breaker would handle. This is a good way for a fire to get started. We no longer live like the Douglas' on Green Acres where if you want to make coffee you have to disconnect the toaster.
    Best listen to someone who knows to keep from burning down your home.
    tkrussell's Avatar
    tkrussell Posts: 9,659, Reputation: 725
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    #11

    Dec 31, 2007, 12:15 PM
    Nothing should be changed to match anything until the circuit size is determined, and the appliance load is identified.

    Off topic, but Mowerman, you stated:

    To start with, you CAN NOT run a 220volt wire to run multiple outlets. This is in violation of national electrical codes. You are even required now in our county to run a seperate 110 volt outlet for a refrigerator, microwave, computer, or freezer,

    What national code are you referring to that do not allow multiple outlets on a 240 volt circuit? Separate circuit for reefer, computer, freezer?

    This is all news to me.
    MOWERMAN2468's Avatar
    MOWERMAN2468 Posts: 3,214, Reputation: 243
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    #12

    Dec 31, 2007, 05:03 PM
    What national code are you referring to that do not allow multiple outlets on a 240 volt circuit? Separate circuit for reefer, computer, freezer?

    This is all news to me.

    Tk, the codes for the reefer, computer, and freezer is local codes for us. Then the nec is now in effect about the 220 volts. According to the inspector for our area at a meeting about 2yrs ago. He said it had been sliding a bit, but that on 01Jan05, it would be enforced for us.
    tkrussell's Avatar
    tkrussell Posts: 9,659, Reputation: 725
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    #13

    Dec 31, 2007, 07:35 PM
    OK, it is a local code, first you said national, and there is none such as that.
    The surgeon's Avatar
    The surgeon Posts: 2, Reputation: 1
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    #14

    Jul 5, 2009, 10:55 AM

    A little off subject but since the plug subject got brought up I thought I might ask.

    I am trying to run a 220v air compressor off a generator. The outlet on the generator is a NEMA 18-30 4pole, 4wire.

    The generator has a 3 wire pigtail on it?

    How can I get this to work??
    jrank1's Avatar
    jrank1 Posts: 1, Reputation: 0
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    #15

    Jan 3, 2012, 06:20 AM
    DANGER! DANGER! DANGER! If you are competent enough as an electrician to rewire the receptacle, you already know the answers, and would never have sent in the question. (No offense intended here.) If you are not competent enough to know the answers, you REALLY, REALLY need to hire an electrician to do the job. What is your home worth? What is your wife's life worth? What is the value of your kids' lives? Bet you they are worth more than you would pay to a trained electrician!
    tooeagle's Avatar
    tooeagle Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #16

    Mar 3, 2012, 06:21 PM
    It's against code anywhere to have more than one 220 (240) volt outlet on any one circuit. If you need another 220 circuit you need to have another run from the circuit breaker (double breaker).
    brent8706's Avatar
    brent8706 Posts: 1, Reputation: 1
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    #17

    Apr 28, 2012, 04:03 PM
    I need to know how to convert a four prong 220 v outlet to a three prong outlet

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