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    shoegal's Avatar
    shoegal Posts: 263, Reputation: 18
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    #1

    Sep 9, 2007, 12:36 PM
    Pregnant Dog
    Hi!
    My shnauzer dog was in heat a couple months ago, and was outside when another shnauzer just showed up in our yard and they started well, going at it haha. Meanwhile, she's pregnant, and today is her 62nd day . Technically, she should give birth tomorrow, but I won't be home all day. She's been scratching things like blankets and the carpet, and I really want her to have the puppies today so I'm with her! Does anyone know a sure sign that a dog's in labor? Thanks so much!
    labman's Avatar
    labman Posts: 10,580, Reputation: 551
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    #2

    Sep 9, 2007, 04:42 PM
    You have had 62 days to get some books and do some reading.
    shoegal's Avatar
    shoegal Posts: 263, Reputation: 18
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    #3

    Sep 9, 2007, 05:46 PM
    I've been reading and my husband and I are totally prepared for this. Our vet knows, and we have her bed set up, it's not like we're total hicks and just let our dogs get knocked up. I know that when she does a lot of digging that could mean she's ready, but she's been digging at things for days, and she has been eatiing, so I'm not sure if she's ready. I was just wondering if anyone knew some "sure" signs that she was in labor.
    sarah1989's Avatar
    sarah1989 Posts: 154, Reputation: 0
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    #4

    Sep 9, 2007, 06:37 PM
    When our dog was nearly ready to have her puppies she started scratching at things try to get comfy I guess so I don't think she's that far away
    sarah1989's Avatar
    sarah1989 Posts: 154, Reputation: 0
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    #5

    Sep 9, 2007, 11:18 PM
    How is you dog going? Has she had her puppies yet?
    shoegal's Avatar
    shoegal Posts: 263, Reputation: 18
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    #6

    Sep 10, 2007, 06:42 PM
    She did! I'm so excited for her, she's such a good mommy! She went into labor at 2 am this morning, and the ultrasound said she's have 3-4 puppies, and what a surprise to us when she had six! We're so excited, they're so darling!
    sarah1989's Avatar
    sarah1989 Posts: 154, Reputation: 0
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    #7

    Sep 10, 2007, 07:16 PM
    Oh wow that's awesome congratulations :)
    labman's Avatar
    labman Posts: 10,580, Reputation: 551
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    #8

    Sep 10, 2007, 08:18 PM
    Considering that we slaughter millions of dogs a year here for lack of homes, somehow takes the edge off my joy. No real dog lover lets accidental breeding happen.
    sarah1989's Avatar
    sarah1989 Posts: 154, Reputation: 0
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    #9

    Sep 10, 2007, 10:09 PM
    What's your problem!!
    Wondergirl's Avatar
    Wondergirl Posts: 37,750, Reputation: 5426
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    #10

    Sep 10, 2007, 10:39 PM
    sarah1989 -- If you volunteered in a dog or cat shelter and saw all the homeless animals, or better yet, worked in a county animal control center and was responsible for euthanizing hundreds of cute and affectionate dogs and cats every week, you wouldn't ask, "whats your problem!!!!" A responsible pet owner doesn't allow uncontrolled breeding and will get his animals neutered.
    labman's Avatar
    labman Posts: 10,580, Reputation: 551
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    #11

    Sep 11, 2007, 03:49 AM
    It is quite possible in Tasmania that you don't have the serious problem we have here with too many dogs and cats. Yet people go on breeding them. There are different reasons, greed is behind much of it, ignorance, a selfish desire for vicarious motherhood, etc. They often use totally unsuited breeding stock that pass on physical or temperamental problems. They give the puppies very poor care, often cooping the mother and puppies up where they have to live in their filth until the puppies lose their instinct for cleanness. This leads to endless misery. Starting with housebreaking made almost impossible. Often the puppies are exposed to disease and die shortly after going to their new home despite running up a huge vet bill. Those that survive continue to have physical problems and many display personality problems such as fear and aggression. It is also very important to socialize the puppies before they are 7-8 weeks old and ready to go to their homes. It is even more important that they are socialized properly before they are 12 weeks old.

    I spend hours every day here and elsewhere helping people cope with crappy puppies bred by people that either don't know how to do it right or just don't care for whatever selfish reasons. Others work at rehabilitating dogs their new owners couldn't cope with. So it is quite difficult for those that are struggling to reduce the misery to be thrilled by those adding to it. I would guess I average seeing 2 questions a day from totally clueless people that have no business breeding dogs. I am sick of it.

    If anybody can't see what I am saying, go to Woodhaven Labradors Articles Quality breeding can be done. I am part of a program that breeds 300-400 puppies a year. All but a few of them are physically and tempermentally sound. It has been years since any of the dozens a year I know were rejected for bad hips.
    katieperez's Avatar
    katieperez Posts: 236, Reputation: 35
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    #12

    Sep 11, 2007, 01:46 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by labman
    Considering that we slaughter millions of dogs a year here for lack of homes, somehow takes the edge off my joy. No real dog lover lets accidental breeding happen.
    I'm with labman 100%. If there's one thing I'm passionate about, it's saving the lives of innocent, helpless animals being destroyed at the hands of irresponsible, selfish human beings. Your dog should've been spayed. If that was too much to ask of you, then you shouldn't have gotten a dog in the first place. What will come of your puppies? Are you able to raise them right and administer all their vaccines and wormings? Then can you carefully screen the new homes they go to? And who's to say they don't end up like the dog in the story 'How could you' so kindly posted earlier. If you haven't read it, I suggest you do. Please excuse my harshness but this one touched a nerve. My apologies.
    sarah1989's Avatar
    sarah1989 Posts: 154, Reputation: 0
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    #13

    Sep 11, 2007, 05:30 PM
    They still don't have to be so rude about it!!
    Its not like it was her fault her dog got pregnant and maybe she didn't want to get her dog fixed maybe she wanted to have puppies one day or maybe she didn't have the money don't judge people and what you don't know
    labman's Avatar
    labman Posts: 10,580, Reputation: 551
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    #14

    Sep 11, 2007, 06:46 PM
    Oh come on now. She let a female in season out by itself. Creating problems for others to fix that way is more than rude.
    bushg's Avatar
    bushg Posts: 3,433, Reputation: 596
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    #15

    Sep 11, 2007, 06:50 PM
    shoegal
    Junior Member
    Join Date: Jun 2006
    Location: USA
    Posts: 124


    Pregnant Dog

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Hi!
    My shnauzer dog was in heat a couple months ago, and was outside when another shnauzer just showed up in our yard and they started well, going at it haha.

    Her first line lead me to believe that this was a purposeful breeding. I think she just wanted a rise out of people.
    sarah1989's Avatar
    sarah1989 Posts: 154, Reputation: 0
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    #16

    Sep 11, 2007, 10:33 PM
    Like you going to keep you eye on your dog 24-7 when there out going to the toilet or whatnot
    labman's Avatar
    labman Posts: 10,580, Reputation: 551
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    #17

    Sep 12, 2007, 03:08 AM
    Preventing accidental breedings is one of the obligations of keeping an intact dog.
    RubyPitbull's Avatar
    RubyPitbull Posts: 3,575, Reputation: 648
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    #18

    Sep 12, 2007, 06:34 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by sarah1989
    like you going to keep you eye on your dog 24-7 when there out going to the toilet or whatnot
    Sarah, things may be different in Tasmania, but in the U.S. most municipalities have very strict leash laws. So yes, here you are expected to know where your dog is at all times.

    Quote Originally Posted by sarah1989
    they stil dont have to be so rude about it!!!
    its not like it was her fault her dog got pregnant and maybe she didnt want to get her dog fixed maybe she wanted to have puppies one day or maybe she didnt have the money dont judge people and what you dont know
    As bushg pointed out, in shoegal's response she appeared to find it funny or wanted her dog to be mated. There are quite a number of us here who do rescue work and we are the ones who have to deal with the result of an "accidental" breeding. There are no accidents when it comes to breeding. "Accidents" are due to either the negligence or purposeful act of the individual involved. Shoegal will be charging people to purchase those puppies as a way to make extra money. Cute puppies grow into adult dogs. There are no guarantees that the people purchasing the pups will keep those dogs for their entire lives. We have a huge problem in the U.S. with an overpopulation of unwanted dogs & cats. What do you do with them? There aren't enough homes to go around so many are euthanized. I, and others here, must participate in the euthanization of dogs & cats that are no longer wanted by those people who purchase the cute puppies and kittens that they do not want to care for anymore. It is a terrible and depressing job, but I would rather be there to make sure that someone cares enough to pet and talk to the animal while they slip away into a forced death. It is the last compassionate act that we can give to an animal that never deserved to be abandoned. THAT is the crux of why shoegal is receiving the response to her breeding question that she is. It may help you to understand how we feel if you just spent one day in a shelter or rescue operation and see all these animals that have been thrown away by their owners through no fault of their own. I think people need to see the result of their actions to fully understand and appreciate our feelings on the subject. Rudeness, in this sense, is subjective.
    katieperez's Avatar
    katieperez Posts: 236, Reputation: 35
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    #19

    Sep 12, 2007, 07:23 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by sarah1989
    they stil dont have to be so rude about it!!!
    its not like it was her fault her dog got pregnant and maybe she didnt want to get her dog fixed maybe she wanted to have puppies one day or maybe she didnt have the money dont judge people and what you dont know
    It is her fault the dog got pregnant. She is fully responsible. If she's using the 'I don't have the money to get her fixed' excuse then she surly doesn't have the money to responsibly raise a litter of healthy puppies. It's not cheap. And if she wanted puppies someday, then she should have gone about it a better way. Breeding is a science. The goal is to improve the breed, which entails knowing the history of each parent, and understanding the genetics of the dogs. It's not OK to just 'want one litter' of puppies. I feel that several people in this thread have earned the right to be rude and judgemental about these types of situations. When is the last time you volunteered at a kill shelter? Perhaps you never have. Rubypitbull is right. It's these so called accidental breedings that are a huge part of our overpopulation problem. It really is a shame. People who allow accidental breedings to happen are either very uneducated or just plain ignorant.
    labman's Avatar
    labman Posts: 10,580, Reputation: 551
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    #20

    Sep 12, 2007, 09:07 AM
    The more I think about it, the more I wonder if rather than an ''accident'', it was an intentional evasion of a stud fee. Hummmmmmmmm, How much checking went into checking the male for possiblegenetic defects and assuring genetic diversity?

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