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-   -   Expert needed. Black beetle with white markings! (https://www.askmehelpdesk.com/entomology/expert-needed-black-beetle-white-markings-298098.html)

  • Jan 2, 2009, 08:34 AM
    dias06
    Expert needed. Black beetle with white markings!
    :confused: I have a question about a beetle.

    I live in south africa, and my dad has been finding these beetles in our garden. We have looked everywhere for information and images.

    It is a small black beetle, 10mm, with long hairy legs (like that of a monkey beetle) it has a similar shape to that of a June bug.

    What is most interesting is the markings... it has irregular white markings (not perfect spots), they look like they have been painted on.

    Starting at the head... there are two oval "spots" on the outer edge, then just below that there are two pin size white spots closer together towards the centre, below that there are again two large "spots" on the outer edge, then again two pin size spots closer to the centre, then the larger "spots" on the outer edge, and below that the larger "spots" again.
    Also there are two "spots" on the bum (if you can call it that) and two "spots" on the underside between the back legs and middle legs.

    OK, long description, I know, but I cannot upload a photo.

    If you have any information let me know please! :D
  • Jan 2, 2009, 08:44 AM
    nitelight198073
    Anoplophora glabripennis
    The Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) is large, ranging from 0.75-1.25 inches long, with very long black and white antennae. The body is glossy black with irregular white spots. These beetles feed on many species of hardwood trees. Adults can be seen from late spring to fall depending on the climate. This beetle was introduced from China and is currently limited to areas within the cities of Chicago and New York.

    I am sorry if this is not it I spent a lot of time looking for it
  • Jan 2, 2009, 11:30 AM
    dias06

    Nope sorry, its not that 1, this bug has very tiny antennae, almost non existent. Like a ladybug's antennae.

    It might not be from south africa... it could very well be an import>> because my dad has been here all his life, over 50 years, and this is the first time he has ever seen it in our garden. Our friends in the same suburb have also spotted this beetle in their garden, they are big gardeners, and swear they have never seen it in their garden before- only in the last 2 months.

    I know how hard you probably searched so thank you.

    Please if anyone has any other suggestions, this beetle is bugging me... pun intended!
  • Jan 2, 2009, 11:40 AM
    dias06
    1 Attachment(s)
    Trying my best to upload a picture hope this works!

    The middle white mark is reflection from the camera, not a mark.

    There are those eight big "spots" along the sides and the 4 pin size ones. Then two "spots" underneath and two on the bum part, you can just see those in the pic.
  • Jan 2, 2009, 05:12 PM
    nitelight198073

    That is sure interesting looking bug.
  • Jan 15, 2009, 07:19 AM
    KungfoowiZ
    4 Attachment(s)
    Hi

    I got them too, it's really cool, as I've just begun collecting them as inspiration. =)

    It's probably a cousin of the Asian Long-horned Beetle, see here:
    http://blog.silive.com/latest_news/2...NED-BEETLE.jpg

    Take a looky...

    Edward
  • Feb 13, 2009, 09:50 AM
    gnahcd
    That probably is a June bug, which is a family classification. The formal name of the family is Scarabaeidae. Beetles from the family are commonly called scarabs or June beetles. I didn't find the species name unfortunately.
    Long-horned beetles are in the family Cerambicidae. Beetles from the family are commonly called long-horned beetles. The long antennae are characteristic, hence the name long-horned beetle.
    Take the pictures to your local agricultural office or university extension for a species identification. Your picture is excellent and should yield results with someone who is familiar with the local fauna.
  • Jan 5, 2010, 03:55 AM
    kedi
    We have also found this beetle in our garden in Cape Town as have colleagues at work. Does anyone have a definitive answer as to what they are?
  • Jan 5, 2010, 04:52 PM
    Catsmine
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kedi View Post
    we have also found this beetle in our garden in Cape Town as have colleagues at work. Does anyone have a definitive answer as to what they are?

    Possibly a flower chafer

    Beetles of Africa - Beetle Details
  • Jan 11, 2010, 06:02 PM
    gnahcd
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Catsmine View Post
    Possibly a flower chafer

    Beetles of Africa - Beetle Details

    Nice find Cats. That is very close. If we are to trust the taxonomy of that website, then the genus name is Rhabdotis. I am not sure if the species would be albinigra, because the spots don't match up.

    The website loses a bit of credibility with me because it places the species within the Pachnoda family, which I don't think is correct. From what I can find, the genus Rhabdotis is in the subfamily Cetoniinae of the family Scarabaeidae. Pachnoda is a genus name.

    Suffice to say, I would place my bet that it is a Rhabdotis species and can be commonly called a flower chafer.

    Although flower chafer is a broad term, and many similar beetles from different genera are called flower chafers.
  • Jan 11, 2010, 06:47 PM
    Catsmine
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gnahcd View Post
    Nice find Cats. That is very close.

    I thought it looked more like a scarab, but that was as close as I can get from Redneck, NC.
  • Jan 15, 2010, 10:09 PM
    firmbeliever
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gnahcd View Post
    Nice find Cats. That is very close. If we are to trust the taxonomy of that website, then the genus name is Rhabdotis. I am not sure if the species would be albinigra, because the spots don't match up.

    The website loses a bit of credibility with me because it places the species within the Pachnoda family, which I don't think is correct. From what I can find, the genus Rhabdotis is in the subfamily Cetoniinae of the family Scarabaeidae. Pachnoda is a genus name.

    Suffice to say, I would place my bet that it is a Rhabdotis species and can be commonly called a flower chafer.

    Although flower chafer is a broad term, and many similar beetles from different genera are called flower chafers.

    Sorry about the rating, pasted the wrong link in it by mistake.

    I found these links and was meaning to link them to you.
    .. :: Flower Beetles - Zambian Species :: ..

    http://www.flower-beetles.com/foto/z...usoleopsis.jpg


    .
  • Jan 19, 2010, 01:15 AM
    gnahcd
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by firmbeliever View Post

    You found it, Firmbeliever! :) That certainly does look like it is Mausoleopsis amabilis aka the white-spotted fruit chafer.

    Mausoleopsis amabilis (Schaum, 1844) on Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    Elephant's Eye: Little black dress at Peace

    Cetoniini (fruit and flower chafers)
  • Feb 3, 2010, 11:16 AM
    Eeyore_NO1
    I also found this beetle in my garden while researching for a science project. It could possibly be a Rhabdotis albinigra burmeister

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