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  • Dec 20, 2006, 08:57 AM
    Ohio_Remodeler
    1 Attachment(s)
    Kitchen Sink Electrical Question
    1. Is it okay to have a surface-mounted incandescent pull-chain light above a kitchen sink? The bottom of the globe is 24" above the top of the sink.

    2. As shown in this drawing, the kitchen sink is in the hallway. The "kitchen" room does not have a sink. I would like to supply the GFI receptacle by the sink with one of the kitchen's 2 small appliance circuits. I would like to use the other circuit to power 4 receptacles in the "kitchen" room. I could not locate a clear definition of kitchen area in the 2005 NEC and am wondering if this is okay.
  • Dec 20, 2006, 11:40 AM
    tkrussell
    Since your following the NEC 2005, see Section 210.70(A)(1) and the remaining text of 210.70, wall switches only allowed, if this is newly renovated and/or new wiring being installed. If the fixture is existing, and has been there, and that space for the sink is not new or renovated, then the pullchain may remain.

    Since the larger room is clearly a kitchen with all the appliances, and the code does not offer a definition of "kitchen", but does require at least two appliance circuits, per Sec 210.11(C)(1), does not state specifically "kitchen", but later the code refers to a traditional kitchen, assuming that is where the appliances will be.

    What you propose is fine, however:
    Why waste an entire circuit at the sink area, and leave all the other major appliances on one circuit in the "kitchen room"? I believe there will be problems, esp with microwave, toasters, coffee maker all on one circuit.
  • Dec 20, 2006, 01:49 PM
    Ohio_Remodeler
    Thanks for the quick answer. I will take your advice and add some receptacles to the GFI receptacle. I will also use a wall switch for the light.

    Are pullchains allowed in the closet of a newly renovated dwelling unit? I did not see any mention of closets in 210.70. I also did not see a mention of switches or pullchains in 410.8.
  • Dec 20, 2006, 03:07 PM
    tkrussell
    No offense, but, lets get with the 21st century and use wall switches.

    If this is a rental unit, plan on being there once a month replacing the cord and eventually the switch when the chain inside the switch breaks.

    If this is for you, treat yourself to a wall switch, or even a recessed door jamb switch that will work like opening the refrigerator, open the door light is on, close the door light goes off.

    Keep in mind, no closet light fixture shall be a bare incandescent lamp, must be a fixture with a globe or can be a bare fluorescent lamp.
  • Dec 20, 2006, 09:16 PM
    labman
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tkrussell
    snip...

    Keep in mind, no closet light fixture shall be a bare incandescent lamp, must be a fixture with a globe or can be a bare flourescent lamp.

    The last refuge of the incandescent. The light instantly and tolerable inefficiency for short term use is now forbidden, at least without a globe? Wonder how many pull chain porcelain fixtures with a bare incandescent bulb are hiding in America's closets. True, the CFL's are making great gains on fast lighting. The short ''on'' cycles likely will kill either one well before the rated life. In a normal application, the higher expense of the CFL is justified by its longer life. Besides, the nuisance of having the bulb burn out and changing bulbs is worth something. Wonder how the ratio holds up to short cycles.

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