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  • Nov 6, 2009, 07:55 AM
    Sanders1
    Light bulb thermostat
    Hello. I would like to find out how to hook up a thermostat to a 100-150W light bulb. I am going to convert an old cooler to an electrode heater. Thank you.
  • Nov 9, 2009, 06:23 PM
    KISS

    You have been kind of orphaned here for a while. Not sure what an electrode heater is or if you were thinking of such as a home thermostat.

    Is it a fixed temperature application? Can you deal with simple ON/OFF control? You won't get the life out of the bulb that way.

    What surface/medium are you measuring? How far away?
  • Nov 9, 2009, 06:33 PM
    Sanders1
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by KeepItSimpleStupid View Post
    You have been kind of orphaned here for a while. Not sure what an electrode heater is or if you were thinking of such as a home thermostat.

    Is it a fixed temperature application? Can you deal with simple ON/OFF control? You won't get the life out of the bulb that way.

    What surface/medium are you measuring? How far away?

    An electrode heater is basically a welding rod heater. I am using a standard beach cooler fitted with an expanded metal shelf system. I want to install a 100-150W light bulb and maintain a temperature of 75-80 degrees F. Just enough heat to keep welding rod flux warm and moisture free. Any thoughts or opinions would be appreciated. Thank you.

    Sam,
  • Nov 9, 2009, 06:54 PM
    KISS

    Hi Sam:

    Use one of these. Digi-Key - 3100U 00031435-ND (Manufacturer - 3100U 00031435)

    Normally closed. Open at 80. Look at data sheet. You would get MUCH better lifetime with the switch if you used a relay or solid state relay (SSR) to turn the lamp on and just used the snap thermostat for control. You can get SSR's with a 120 VAC control signal. They need heatsink too. Size at 10 amps, not 1. Other reliability options include a I^2 fuse for a 10 A system) in series with a regular one rated at 1A. The I^2t fuses can set you back $40 with holder.

    To get rid of moisture, will probably require a dessicant because you have to get over 100 C to get rid of the moisture by heating.

    Standard lab dessicants can be re-generated by heating after they turn color.
  • Nov 10, 2009, 02:19 PM
    KISS

    If you need more help, holler.

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