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    FAQ: How to Troubleshoot, Repair & Maintain Hondas and Selected Other Vehicles

    Asked Dec 4, 2006, 09:16 AM 85 Answers
    Check out these tips and explanations from our Senior Cars & Trucks Expert.

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    Last edited by TxGreaseMonkey; Jan 13, 2010 at 06:22 PM.
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    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 16,669, Reputation: 5593
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    #2

    Dec 4, 2006, 09:33 AM


    Honda:


    . Honda OBD-II Diagnostic Trouble Codes (1996 and Later)
    . Ignition Timing Adjustment
    . Fuel Pump Test and Replacement
    . Fuel Pressure Regulator Test
    . Fuel Filter Replacement
    . Main Relay Harness Tests
    . Main Relay Ventilation Holes
    . Fuel Injector Replacement
    . Oxygen Sensor Replacement
    . Headlight Replacement
    . Combination Light Switch Replacement
    . Headlight Adjustment
    . Starter Motor Replacement
    . Clutch Master Cylinder Replacement
    . Battery Acid Damage
    . Changing Spark Plugs
    . Changing Engine Oil and Filter
    . Changing Power Steering Fluid
    . Changing Manual Transmission Fluid
    . CV Driveshaft: Inspection
    . CV Driveshaft: Removal
    . CV Driveshaft: Disassembly
    . CV Driveshaft: Repacking and Reassembly
    . CV Driveshaft: Installation
    . PCV Valve Replacement
    . Clutch Pedal Maintenance
    . Windshield Wiper Motor Replacement
    . Rear Wheel Bearing Replacement


    General Automotive:

    . Preventing Coil-On-Plug (COP) Problems
    . Antifreeze: Automaker Approved Chemistry
    . Radiator and Heater Hose Replacement
    . Radiator Winter Hyper Cooling (Winter Front)
    . Eliminating Air Conditioning System Odors
    . Importance of Changing Automatic Transmission Filter
    . Serpentine Belt and Pulley Replacement
    . Idler Pulley Bearing Replacement
    . Reading a Tire's Manufacturing Date
    . After Clearing Codes, How Many Miles Do You Need To Drive Before You Can Have The Car Inspected?
    . Engine Misfires
    . Rear Window Defogger Troubleshooting
    . Toyota to Begin Requiring 0W-20 Synthetic Engine Oil
    . Brake Booster Test
    . Locating Vacuum Leaks
    . Buying a Used Car or Truck
    . Block/Head Sealers
    . Heater Problems
    . Buying a Salvage Engine
    . GM's New Radio Code Procedure



    Ford and Mercury:

    . How-to Clean the Mass Air Flow (MAF) Sensor
    . How-to Change the Fuel Filter on Most Ford Cars and Trucks
    . How-to Replace Rear Wheel Bearing/Hub Assembly on a 1996 thru 2001 Ford Taurus and Mercury Sable
    . How-to Replace Front Sway Bar Bushings on Ford Tauruses and Mercury Sables
    . How-to Perform Electronic Air Temperature Control (EATC) On-Board Diagnostic Tests on Many Fords and Mercurys
    . How-to Stop Vacuum Hose Leaks
    . How-to Remove and Install a Transmission Range Sensor (TRS)
    . How-to Change Front and Rear Bulbs on a 2000 and Later Ford Taurus
    . FordParts.Com
    . Replacing Front Rotors on Ford 4x4s


    See Also:
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    #3

    Dec 4, 2006, 08:54 PM


    12. Honda Ignition Timing Adjustment

    1. Start the engine and warm it up to normal operating temperature.

    2. Adjust “Final Idle Speed” to 700 rpm, using the idle speed adjustment procedures above.

    3. Turn off engine and all electrical systems.

    4. Jump the Service Check Connector (SCC) with a paper clip.

    5. Connect positive inductive timing light lead to the positive battery terminal.

    6. Connect negative inductive timing light lead to engine ground.

    7. Connect inductive timing light lead to the No. 1 spark plug wire.

    8. Start engine.

    9. Using the timing light, rotate the distributor, after loosening the three 12mm mounting bolts, until timing is set to 16 degrees BTDC* on the crankshaft pulley. 16 degrees BTDC should be the middle of the three clustered hash marks on the pulley. Align middle hash mark on pulley with pointer above. You may want to take chalk or yellow paint and highlight the hash mark first.

    10. Button everything up.

    11. Remove the BACKUP fuse for 10 seconds, in order to reset the computer. Record any radio codes first.

    *D15B7/D15Z1/D16Z6 engines.


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    #4

    Dec 4, 2006, 10:05 PM


    31. Starter Motor Replacement

    On most 4-cylinder Civics and Accords, the starter motor is located on the passenger's side of the transmission, just beneath and to the rear of the distributor. The large starter motor cable, from the positive battery terminal, goes right to it.

    1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.

    2. Disconnect the starter cable from the "B" terminal on the solenoid, then the BLK/WHT wire from the "S" terminal.

    3. Remove the two bolts (14 mm) holding the starter; then, remove the starter. A 3/8-inch drive ratchet wrench or breaker bar, with a 6-inch extension, usually does the trick. Spray both bolts with PB Blaster, Kroil, or Liquid Wrench first.

    4. Install in the reverse order of removal.

    NOTE: When installing the starter cable, ensure the crimped side of the ring terminal is facing out. It's a good idea to clean both terminals and connectors with #240 abrasive cloth, or steel wool, and coat with dielectric grease.


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    #5

    Dec 9, 2006, 09:41 AM
    25. Honda Oxygen Sensor Replacement


    Trick: Take a small flashlight and and figure out how the oxygen sensor's 4-wire pigtail connector comes apart--don't force it. Frequently, the trick is to gently separate the connector from the bayonet mount first; then, it easily comes apart or it's apparent how it unlocks. Honda connectors can be tricky and give some do-it-yourselfers a fit.


    Background. The basic job of the sensor is to monitor the air fuel mixture under idle, moderate acceleration, and cruise conditions. Under heavy acceleration, the oxygen sensor goes into "open loop," which basically means the ECM ignores the oxygen sensor.

    Removal. Remove heat shield, spray old oxygen sensor with PB Blaster or Kroil (let it sit for a while), spray with PB Blaster or Kroil again, warm-up car for several minutes, and use a 15-inch breaker bar on the end of a 22mm oxygen sensor socket to remove sensor. Afterwards, clean threads thoroughly with brake cleaner, allow to sit for quite a while and "air out," and install new oxygen sensor with anti-seize compound. Good cleaning technique is a must. Tighten to 33 lb-ft or 4.5 kg-m. Lightly coat heat shield bolts with anti-seize compound, before reinstalling the heat shield.

    I am not a fan of universal oxygen sensors or those made by Bosch for Hondas. I recommend Denso sensors. Over time, you want the best sensor or you will pay for it in poor gas mileage and performance. Oxygen sensors are EXTREMELY sensitive to anything, particularly silicone spray, RTV sealers, WD-40, or any oil on the pigtail connector. Don't even use non-chlorinating brake cleaner or electrical contact cleaner on oxygen sensor connectors. NEVER use any of these products around the oxygen sensor or pigtail connector. If you do, the ECM will keep throwing a code forever, once the engine warms up and is out of "open loop" mode. Remove pigtail connector and gently dress the male and female connectors with jeweler files, if you suspect any contamination.

    After replacing the oxygen sensor, on OBD-I vehicles, clear the Check Engine Light by removing the Back Up (7.5 A) Fuse in the under hood fuse box, or by disconnecting the negative battery cable, for 10 seconds to reset the ECM. On OBD-II vehicles, use a code reader or scan tool to reset the ECM.

    Excellent teaching thread on oxygen sensors:

    https://www.askmehelpdesk.com/cars-t...gs-460682.html


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    #6

    Dec 11, 2006, 07:26 AM
    28. Honda Civic Headlight Replacement

    1. Remove front turn signal/parking lights.

    2. Remove front bumper.

    3. Remove mounting bolts and nuts, remove headlight, and disconnect connector.

    4. After replacement, adjust headlights to local requirements.


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    #7

    Dec 11, 2006, 08:13 AM
    18. Honda Civic Fuel Filter Replacement

    The fuel filter should be replaced 1) every 4 years or 60,000 miles, whichever comes first, or 2) whenever the fuel pressure drops below 40-47 psi, with the fuel pressure regulator vacuum hose disconnected and pinched, after making sure that the fuel pump and the fuel pressure regulator are OK.

    1. Disconnect negative battery cable.

    2. Place shop towel under and around fuel filter.

    3. Relieve fuel pressure, by removing gas cap.

    4. Remove 12 mm banjo bolt and 14 mm fuel feed pipe (use flare wrench) from fuel filter.

    5. Remove fuel filter clamp and fuel filter.

    6. Use new copper washers, when assembling.

    7. Tighten banjo bolt to 16 lb-ft, service bolt (middle of banjo bolt) to 11 lb-ft, and fuel feed pipe to 28 lb-ft. Clean flared joint of high pressure hoses thoroughly before reconnecting.

    CAUTION: Only change fuel filter when the engine is cold. Keep a Class B fire extinguisher ready. No smoking or open flames allowed (e.g. gas hot water heater, dryer, or furnace). Keep tools a safe distance from battery. Wear safety goggles.


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    #8

    Dec 19, 2006, 08:49 PM
    36. Clutch Master Cylinder Replacement

    1. Suck brake fluid out of master cylinder reservoir, using a battery squeeze bulb.

    2. Disconnect clutch pipe and reservoir hose from clutch master cylinder.

    3. Pry out cotter pin, pull pedal pin out of the yoke, and remove mounting nuts.

    4. Remove clutch master cylinder.

    5. Install clutch master cylinder in reverse order of removal.

    6. Bleed system.


    Two items are important to remember about hydraulic clutches:

    1. Don't overfill the clutch master cylinder reservoir.

    2. Change brake fluid every 2 years, to flush crud from the system and replace fluid lubricity and corrosion properties.


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    #9

    Dec 23, 2006, 09:03 AM
    15. Fuel Pump Test and Replacement

    Test

    1. Remove rear seat.

    2. Remove access panel (4 screws).

    3. Disconnect the 2P connector.

    CAUTION: Be sure to turn ignition switch OFF, before disconnecting the wires.

    4. Disconnect the main relay connector and connect the BLK/YEL (5) wire and YEL/GRN (7) wire with a jumper wire.

    5. Check for battery voltage at the fuel pump connector, when ignition switch is turned ON (position II). Attach red test probe to the YEL/GRN wire and negative probe to the BLK wire. If battery voltage is available, replace the fuel pump. If there is no voltage, check fuel pump ground and wire harness.


    Replacement

    1. Relieve fuel pressure, by removing fuel tank cap.

    2. Remove rear seat.

    3. Remove access panel (4 screws).

    4. Disconnect fuel lines and connector.

    5. Remove fuel pump mounting nuts.

    6. Remove fuel pump from fuel tank.


    WARNING: Do not smoke while working on fuel system. Keep open flames away from work area.


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    #10

    Jan 22, 2007, 09:07 PM
    11. Radiator Winter Hyper Cooling (Winter Front)

    Our cold weather friends, living in places like Alaska, Canada, Northern Europe, and the Baltics, who are experiencing insufficient heat during the winter, may want to restrict the airflow through the radiator, by carefully rigging a plastic radiator cover (winter front). You may have to experiment with the proper size--better yet, make it adjustable. This is not an uncommon problem, during the winter, on some vehicles. I'm sure you have seen folding mechanical radiator covers on some delivery trucks. Your heater core, when the blower is turned on high, may be acting like an efficient radiator and dropping the engine temperature too much (hyper cooling). A simple "winter front" could make a big difference in your driving comfort, performance, and gas mileage.

    Here are some pictures that may help:

    Winter fronts from Alaska Tent and Tarp


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    #11

    Feb 18, 2007, 07:12 PM
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    #12

    Mar 15, 2007, 10:04 PM
    6. Honda OBD-II Diagnostic Trouble Codes (1996 and Later)

    Plug scan tool into Data Link Connector (DLC), turn ignition to ON, and read code.

    P0106--MAP Circuit Range Or Performance
    P0107--MAP Circuit Low Input
    P0108--MAP Circuit High Input
    P0111--IAT Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
    P0112--IAT Sensor Circuit Low Input
    P0113--IAT Sensor Circuit High Input
    P0116--ECT Circuit Range Or Performance
    P0117--ECT Circuit Low Input
    P0118--ECT Circuit High Input
    P0122--TP Sensor Circuit Low Input
    P0123--TP Sensor Circuit High Input
    P0131--Primary HO2S Circuit Low Voltage (Sensor 1)
    P0132--Primary HO2S Circuit High Voltage (Sensor 1)
    P0133--Primary HO2S Circuit Slow Response (Sensor 1)
    P0135--Front HO2S Heater Circuit Fault (Sensor 1)
    P0137--Secondary HO2S Circuit Low Voltage (Sensor 2)
    P0138--Secondary HO2S Circuit High Voltage (Sensor 2)
    P0139--Secondary HO2S Circuit Slow Response (Sensor 2)
    P0141--Secondary HO2S Heater Circuit Fault (Sensor 2)
    P0171--System Too Lean
    P0172--System Too Rich
    P0300--Random Misfire
    P0301--Misfire Cyl. 1 Or Random Misfire
    P0302--Misfire Cyl. 2 Or Random Misfire
    P0303--Misfire Cyl. 3 Or Random Misfire
    P0304--Misfire Cyl. 4 Or Random Misfire
    P0305--Misfire Cyl. 5 Or Random Misfire
    P0306--Misfire Cyl. 6 Or Random Misfire
    P0325--KS Circuit Malfunction
    P0335--CKP Sensor Circuit Low Input
    P0336--CKP Sensor Range/Performance
    P0401--EGR Insufficient Flow Detected
    P0420--Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold
    P0441--EVAP Emission Control System Improper Purge Flow
    P0451--Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor Range/Performance
    P0452--Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor Circuit Low Input
    P0453--Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor Circuit High Input
    P0500--VSS Circuit Malfunction (M/T)
    P0501--VSS Circuit Range/Performance (A/T)
    P0505--ICS Malfunction
    P0560--Powertrain Control Module (PCM) Backup Voltage Circuit Low Voltage
    P0700--A/T Concerns
    P0720--A/T Concerns
    P0725--A/T Concerns
    P0730--A/T Concerns
    P0740--A/T Concerns
    P0753--A/T Concerns
    P0758--A/T Concerns
    P0763--A/T Concerns
    P0780--A/T Concerns
    P1106--BARO Circuit Range/Performance
    P1107--BARO Circuit Low Input
    P1108--BARO Circuit High Input
    P1121--Throttle Position Lower Than Expected
    P1122--Throttle Position Higher Than Expected
    P1128--MAP Lower Than Expected
    P1129--MAP Higher Than Expected
    P1149--Primary HO2S (Sensor 1) Circuit Range/Performance Problem
    P1162--Primary HO2S (No. 1) Circuit Malfunction
    P1163--Primary HO2S (No. 1) Circuit Slow Response
    P1164--Primary HO2S (No. 1) Circuit Range/Performance
    P1165--Primary HO2S (No. 1) Circuit Range/Performance
    P1166--Primary HO2S (No. 1) Heater System Electrical
    P1167--Primary HO2S (No. 1) Heater System
    P1168--Primary HO2S (No. 1) LABEL Low Input
    P1169--Primary HO2S (No. 1) LABEL High Input
    P1253--VTEC System Malfunction
    P1257--VTEC System Malfunction
    P1258--VTEC System Malfunction
    P1259--VTEC System Malfunction
    P1297--Electrical Load Detector Circuit Low Input
    P1298--Electrical Load Detector Circuit High Input
    P1300--Multiple Cylinder Misfire Detected
    P1336--CSF Sensor Intermittent Interruption
    P1337--CSF Sensor No Signal
    P1359--CKP/TDC Sensor Connector Disconnection
    P1361--TDC Sensor Intermittent Interruption
    P1362--TDC Sensor No Signal
    P1366--TDC Sensor No. 2 Intermittent Interruption
    P1367--TDC Sensor No 2 Signal
    P1381--Cylinder Position Sensor Intermittent Interruption
    P1382--Cylinder Position Sensor No Signal
    P1456--EVAP Emission Control System Leak Detected (Fuel Tank System)
    P1457--EVAP Emission Control System Leak Detected (Control Canister System)
    P1459--EVAP Emission Purge Flow Switch Malfunction
    P1486--Thermostat Range/Performance Problem
    P1491--EGR Valve Lift Insufficient Detected
    P1498--EGR Valve Lift Sensor High Voltage
    P1508--IAC Valve Circuit Failure
    P1509--IAC Valve Circuit Failure
    P1519--Idle Air Control Valve Circuit Failure
    P1607--ECM/PCM Internal Circuit Failure A
    P1655--SEAF/SEFA/TMA/TMB Signal Line Failure
    P1660--A/T FI Signal A Circuit Failure
    P1676--FPTDR Signal Line Failure
    P1678--FPTDR Signal Line Failure
    P1681--A/T FI Signal A Low Input
    P1682--A/T FI Signal A High Input
    P1686--A/T FI Signal B Low Input
    P1687--A/T FI Signal B High Input
    P1705--A/T Concerns
    P1706--A/T Concerns
    P1738--A/T Concerns
    P1739--A/T Concerns
    P1753--A/T Concerns
    P1758--A/T Concerns
    P1768--A/T Concerns
    P1773--A/T Concerns
    P1785--A/T Concerns
    P1786--A/T Concerns
    P1790--A/T Concerns
    P1791--A/T Concerns
    P1792--A/T Concerns
    P1793--A/T Concerns
    P1794--A/T Concerns
    P1870--A/T Concerns
    P1873--A/T Concerns
    P1879--A/T Concerns
    P1885--A/T Concerns
    P1886--A/T Concerns
    P1888--A/T Concerns
    P1890--A/T Concerns
    P1891--A/T Concerns

    OBD-II Code Definitions

    Example:
    P 0 1 0 1
    1 2 3 4 5

    1st digit
    P = powertrain
    B = Body
    C = Chassis

    2nd digit
    0 = Standard
    1 = Manufacturer specific

    3rd digit
    1 = Emission management
    2 = Injector circuit
    3 = Ignition
    4 = Auxiliary emission
    5 = Vehicle speed & idle control
    6 = Computer & output circuit
    7 = Transmission



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    #13

    Mar 24, 2007, 11:42 AM
    41. Battery Acid Damage

    Few things can slowly and surely do as much damage to your car as battery acid. The results can be catastrophic; i.e. under-hood fuse/relay boxes, wiring harnesses, air conditioning hoses, power steering units, half axles, and battery trays can be ruined. One way to help prevent this is to not overfill batteries. If you do, acid mist will start to cover surrounding components, when the alternator charges the battery. Another way to help prevent battery acid damage is to make a battery cover. Take a plastic milk jug, cut a hole for the negative battery terminal, and size to fit half the battery. This will help protect the under-hood fuse/relay box on many Civics, which cost around $250, from battery acid. It will also help protect key wiring harnesses and air conditioning components from acid. Finally, I recommend removing the battery from the car every 6 months. During this time, wash the battery, check water levels, and inspect the car for acid damage. It helps to have a spray bottle of baking soda and water handy for problem areas. Strategically place a genuine copper penny or two under the tie-down clamp to help prevent acid build-up on the battery terminals.


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    #14

    Apr 5, 2007, 05:33 PM
    17. Fuel Pressure Regulator Test

    The fuel pressure regulator maintains a constant fuel pressure to the fuel injectors. When the difference between the fuel pressure and manifold pressure exceeds 43 psi, the diaphragm is pushed upward, and the excess fuel is fed back into the fuel tank through the return line.

    Test:

    1. Attach fuel pressure gauge to service port of fuel filter. Pressure should be 40-47 psi, with fuel pressure regulator vacuum hose disconnected and pinched.

    2. Reconnect vacuum hose to fuel pressure regulator.

    3. Check that fuel pressure rises when vacuum hose from fuel pressure regulator is disconnected again. If fuel pressure did not rise, replace fuel pressure regulator.


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    #15

    Apr 6, 2007, 01:21 PM
    20. Main Relay Harness Tests

    If you know the main relay is good, hopefully because you replaced it after 120,000 miles or 10 years, whichever came first, but it still doesn't operate properly, the main relay harness needs to be inspected. Here's how to do it on many Honda 7-P relays:

    1. Disconnect main relay connector. Check for continuity between BLK Terminal 2 and body ground. If there isn't continuity, repair an open in BLK wire between the main relay and the main ECM ground, located on the thermostat housing. If there is continuity, then:

    2. Measure voltage between YEL/WHT Terminal 1 and body ground. If there isn't battery voltage, replace the ECM (15 A) fuse in the under-hood fuse box or repair an open in the YEL/WHT wire between the main relay and the ECM fuse. If there is battery voltage, then:

    3. Turn the ignition switch to ON and measure voltage between BLK/YEL Terminal 5 and body ground. If there isn't battery voltage, then replace ACG (ALT) (S) (15 A) fuse in the under-dash fuse box or repair an open in the BLK/YEL wire between the main relay and the ACG (ALT) (S) (15 A) fuse. If there is battery voltage, then:

    4. Turn the ignition switch to START. For manual transmissions, the clutch pedal must be depressed; for automatic transmissions, the gear selector must be in Neutral or Park. Measure voltage between BLU/WHT Terminal 6 and body ground. If there isn't battery voltage, replace STARTER SIGNAL (7.5 A) fuse in the under-dash fuse box or repair an open in the BLU/WHT wire between the main relay and the STARTER SIGNAL (7.5 A) fuse. If there is battery voltage, turn the ignition switch OFF, then:

    5. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Next, disconnect the "A" connector from the ECM and check for continuity between GRN/YEL Terminal 8 and Terminals A7, A8. If there isn't continuity, repair an open in the GRN/YEL wire between ECM (A7, A8) and the main relay.


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    #16

    Jun 26, 2007, 07:18 AM
    29. Combination Light Switch Replacement

    1. Disconnect negative battery cable.

    2. Remove lower dashboard cover (3 screws).

    3. Remove upper and lower steering column covers (3 screws).

    4. Disconnect 4-P and 7-P connectors from combination light switch, remove both screws, and lift out switch.


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    #17

    Jul 30, 2007, 11:39 AM
    21. Main Relay Ventilation Holes

    To reduce heat generated by the PGM-FI Main Relay, drill numerous small ventilation holes in the cover. This may help extend the relay's life.


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    #18

    Aug 9, 2007, 10:30 AM
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    #19

    Aug 25, 2007, 09:34 AM
    18. Serpentine Belt and Pulley Replacement

    The generic information below is for all vehicles with serpentine belts.

    1. Routing diagram. Before removing the serpentine belt, ensure you have a routing diagram. It's often located on the fan shroud. Sketch your own, or take pictures with your cell phone, if necessary.

    2. Belt removal. Using a suitable serpentine belt tool, attach tool to spring tensioner and rotate in the appropriate direction to relieve belt tension. In order to get the necessary leverage, the tool may need to be at least 15 inches long; e.g. a flexible "T" wrench or breaker bar. Many auto parts stores loan specialized serpentine belt tools for free. With one hand, relieve belt tension; with the other hand, remove belt from auxiliary components. Afterwards, carefully release tensioner.

    3. Tensioner and pulley removal. Unfasten bolt securing tensioner to engine block--on some vehicles, this step is unnecessary, depending upon whether pulley bolt is accessible or not. Next, unfasten bolt securing pulley to tensioner. Install new pulley/bearing (tighten 18 to 22 ft.-lbs.) and button up.

    4. Belt replacement. Route new belt over various pulleys (water pump pulley last), rotate tensioner to allow belt to be installed, and then release tensioner. Ensure belt fits properly into pulley grooves. It must be completely engaged. On some vehicles, where space is particularly tight, use a 1/4" x 30" dowel to route belt over pulleys.

    Serpentine drive belts are durable, long-lived components. Small cracks in the underside of a v-ribbed belt are acceptable. Lengthwise cracks, or missing pieces that cause the belt to make noise, are cause for replacement. Normally, I recommend belt and pulley replacement every 80,000 miles or 7 years, whichever comes first.


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    #20

    Sep 10, 2007, 09:38 PM
    30. Headlight Adjustment

    Adjust headlights to local requirements, by turning its adjusters. Use a small flashlight to locate the horizontal and vertical adjusting points, which are gear mechanisms. Frequently, there's a slotted hole in the frame, going to the horizontal adjusting point, and a round hole in the frame, going to the vertical adjusting point. Use a #2 Phillips head screwdriver to rotate adjusters.


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