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sailingyoho
May 2, 2007, 02:19 PM
The line going into the old phone jack has orange, green, blue and 3 white wires in it. Bought a new jack at Radio Shack and the colors of the wires in the replacement jack are red, green, black and yellow.

Verizon repair was at best, snotty in telling me "we cannot tell you how to do repairs over the phone." They wanted an arm and a leg to come out to do the repair. Because of their attitude, I would pay someone else double rather than have Verizon do it.

I am pretty handy and know this is not a big deal to do. I just need to know which colors to match with which other colors to make the connection when the phone wire has one set of colors and the jack has a different set of colors. Any anyone help me?

Thank you and be blessed,
Terry

ebaines
May 2, 2007, 02:35 PM
You say that there are 3 white wires - each of these should be twisted with one of the blue, orange, and green wires, to form three pairs. Telephone cable convention is the first pair in a multiple-pair cable is the "blue-white" pair. The second is "orange-white" and the third pair is "green-white." So you need to look again and see if you can tell which white wire is paired with blue, which with the orange, and which is with the green.

Once you do that, the first pair is the blue-white, so that is most likely (though not necessarily) the pair that carries your phone circuit. This pair should be wired to the green-red in the replacenmeng jack you bought - white to green and blue to red. If this doesn't work, then I suggest the following:

1. If you have a volt-meter, check to see which pair has -48volts on it (telephone lines are generally powered w/ -48volts from the telco). That is the active pair. Connect that pair to the red-green pair in the jack.

2. If ypou don't have a volt-meter, and you have access to the NID (the point of inteface between the house wiring and the telco), you may be able to tell there which pair of your interior house wiring is connected to the Telco.

Here's a site with some info on telephone plant color codes:

Doing your own telephone wiring (http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~kurisuto/phone_wiring.html)

labman
May 2, 2007, 02:45 PM
We have long lacked a good telephone expert here. I hope ebaines is it. I have been quite happy to see others show up on some forums.

One other thing to try is if you haven't remove the wires from the old jack, see if it has the R, G, Y, and B labels. Then connect the same wires to the R and G.

ebaines
May 2, 2007, 02:56 PM
Thanks Labman! Good suggestion regarding labeling on the old jack.

I wouldn't call myself a real expert, although I have picked up a few things during 20 years designing products at Bell Labs. Most of the questions in this particular forum could best be answered by someone with experience as a TelCo outside plant installer or repair technician.

Stratmando
May 5, 2007, 01:20 PM
Excellent site from ebaines

White/Blue to Green Positive voltage Line 1
Blue/White to Red Negative voltage Line 1
White/Orange to Black Positive voltage Line 2
Orange/White to Yellow Negative voltage Line 2

When phone is on hook voltage about -48
When phone is off hook voltage about -6 to 9?
Ringing about 90 volts AC.
If some one calls while touching wires, You may get shocked(Never known to kill anyone)
Luckily the ringing will stop. Your phone, not your ears. Your ears shouldn't ring.
To be real careful, unplug phone jack outside house if available , after identifying correct pair(s).

nNova
May 30, 2007, 08:10 PM
The line going into the old phone jack has orange, green, blue and 3 white wires in it. Bought a new jack at Radio Shack and the colors of the wires in the replacement jack are red, green, black and yellow.

Verizon repair was at best, snotty in telling me "we cannot tell you how to do repairs over the phone." They wanted an arm and a leg to come out to do the repair. Because of their attitude, I would pay someone else double rather than have Verizon do it.

I am pretty handy and know this is not a big deal to do. I just need to know which colors to match with which other colors to make the connection when the phone wire has one set of colors and the jack has a different set of colors. Any anyone help me?

Thank you and be blessed,
Terry
Not everyone at Verizon is snobby, please give us a 2nd chance.

The new primary wires are Red and Green... the old version of this was your Blue and White with blue strip.

The new secondary is the black and yellow... the old version was Yellow and white with yellow.


There was an old third pair as well which were the green and white with green stripe.

See the chart at this site for which is transmit / receive
Check out this site RJ11, RJ14, RJ25 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RJ11,_RJ14,_RJ25)

Stratmando
Jun 5, 2007, 06:36 AM
In Florida, red, green, yellow, black, are our old wires. And category wiring(UTP)
Unshielded Twisted Pair. Is now commonly used. As an Electrician and phone contractor,
Have been using Cat 3 wiring for the past 10+ years, Which allows installation of phone system or regular phones. Wish everone would do it instead of daisey chaining. Currently using Cat 5e.(Has OLD? Wirecolors)blue, orange, green and brown with their whites.

Verizon, are you saying I should rip out my old category wiring, And replace with the new?
Red, Green, Yellow, and Black?

sailingyoho
Jun 5, 2007, 07:46 AM
The line going into the old phone jack has orange, green, blue and 3 white wires in it. Bought a new jack at Radio Shack and the colors of the wires in the replacement jack are red, green, black and yellow.

Verizon repair was at best, snotty in telling me "we cannot tell you how to do repairs over the phone." They wanted an arm and a leg to come out to do the repair. Because of their attitude, I would pay someone else double rather than have Verizon do it.

I am pretty handy and know this is not a big deal to do. I just need to know which colors to match with which other colors to make the connection when the phone wire has one set of colors and the jack has a different set of colors. Any anyone help me?

Thank you and be blessed,
Terry
Thank you all who have replied.

Special to Verizon: I know most are not snobbyor snotty but it seems the ones who have first contact with the public are. I am not throwing the baby out with the bath water. Thank you for renewing my faith in Verizon.

ebaines
Jun 5, 2007, 08:48 AM
not everyone at Verizon is snobby, please give us a 2nd chance.

the new primary wires are Red and Green.................the old version of this was your Blue and White with blue strip.

the new secondary is the black and yellow.................the old version was Yellow and white with yellow.


there was an old third pair as well which were the green and white with green stripe.

see the chart at this site for which is transmit / receive
check out this site RJ11, RJ14, RJ25 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RJ11,_RJ14,_RJ25)

I must disagree with the characterization of "new" and "old" versions here. Both the red,green, yellow,black and the blue/white, orange/white etc color code conventions have been around since at least the 1950's, so I don't think you would call either of them "new." The confusion here is that the R/G/Y/B wire codes were deployed by the Bell System in most residential premises telephone applications for Plain old Telephone Service (POTS) applications, where only one or two pairs of wire were installed, and it was purely intended for voice applications. The Blue/White, orange/white... convention was originally developed for large pair count outside plant cables - some OSP cables were as large as 3000 pairs under one sheath. It was also used in premises if more than 2 pairs were installed. Why the difference in color codes? I don't really know, except that the residential phone division and the Outside Plant cable divisions within Bell Labs (where I used to work and all this stuff was developed) and AT&T were completely separate divisions, so it's not surprising that different organizations developed different rules. (To add even more confusion, the standard for color codes of cables used in the telephone company central office are different yet again - but that's another topic).

When the first widely-deployed standard for premises data cabling were developed by industry standards groups following the AT&T divestiture in the 1980s, they selected the Bell System's OSP color-code standard because 4 pairs were to be deployed to each work station. Since then virtually all premises wiring in businesses follow these codes, as do many residential installations. All high-performing premises cabling systems use Category 3 or better cable - Cat 5e or Cat 6 wiring these days, to allow deployment of applications operating up to 1 Gb/s on unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cable. (Side note - the standard for 10Gb/s on UTP, called Cat 6 Augmented, is expected to be ratified in the next few months.) The old red/green/yellow/black wire is really only good for voice applications. So no, Stratmando, do not go back to the old R/G/Y/B wires. And your point about not daisy-chaining any more, even in residential applications, is a good one.

Stratmando
Jun 5, 2007, 11:39 AM
Sorry ebaines, I was being sarcastic about going back to quad wiring. Thanks for clearing up. I WAS talking residential.
Something else I have been doing for ever is, in Bedrooms and Living room, is run both TV and Tel to both sides of room,(TV across room, and Phone next to bed), for ablity to rearrange furniture and beds. Before Pay cable and pay satellite needed landline. Houses I have been doing for past 15 years, already wired for phone jack at TV. Just lucked out.
No need to run new phone line, or us the 2 boxes that allow Phone signal to be placed on electrical for Satellite.
Ebaines, Thanks again.. Take Care

RDKerr
Mar 3, 2010, 06:18 PM
All these previous are good but I have a unique problem. Old house. 1972. Remodel with Cat 5. They put all Cat5 orange together, all blue, all white/blue and all white/orange together. One beige sheath with yellow (unused), Red they put to Blue cat5, Green to white/blue cat5. I have a black sheath (underground) to my barn with Orange, blue, white/orange, and white/blue in it. Please tell me which ones connect the barn wires to which cat 5 colors. I had blue to blue, orange to orange, white/orange to white/orange and white/blue to white/blue but it doesn't work. Thought it should. Help!

Stratmando
Mar 3, 2010, 08:06 PM
RDKerr,
White/Blue to Green, and Blue/White to Red, is Correct, like you have.
I have seen Electricians Wire Red to Orange, because there is no red in 8 conductor Cat5, and orange color is closest to red, and Green/White to Green, because that is the closest to green??

Blue pair is line 1, Orange pair line 2, then the green and brown pair.
A voltmeter can find the voltage of a good pair(line), the negative of the pair will connect to blue/white(red), and the positive connects to the white/blue
You are looking for about 48 volts DC, do quickly as a slight skock may occur if ringing, about 90 volts AC.
See what colors are attached outside.