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    FAQ: How to Troubleshoot, Repair & Maintain Hondas and Selected Other Vehicles

    Asked Dec 4, 2006, 09:16 AM 85 Answers
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    Last edited by TxGreaseMonkey; Jan 13, 2010 at 06:22 PM.
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    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 15,944, Reputation: 5553
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    #31

    Jan 10, 2008, 01:08 PM


    52. PCV Valve Replacement

    Perform every 60,000 miles or 4 years, whichever comes first.


    1. Disconnect PCV Valve hose from throttle body, using a pair of pliers to remove spring clamp.

    2. Remove PCV Valve and hose from intake manifold.

    3. Disconnect PCV Valve from hose, using a pair of pliers to remove the other spring clamp. Using a spray can of brake cleaner, with the "straw" attached, spray inside of hose. This will remove any residual sludge, dirt, and sand. Take a pipe cleaner, dipped in fuel injector cleaner, and clean the port on the throttle body.

    4. Install cleaned hose to a new PCV Valve and button everything up.

    This will help your engine idle and perform better, last longer, and reduce emissions. Synthetic oils, with their lower NOACK Volatility (evaporation due to heat) characteristics, greatly reduce PCV Valve and hose contamination.



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    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 15,944, Reputation: 5553
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    #32

    Jan 25, 2008, 09:21 AM


    6. Preventing Coil-On-Plug (COP) Problems

    Many repair shops are reporting a large number of coil-on-plug (COP) failures with engines. The majority of problems are related to 1) customers washing their engines, or 2) body repair shops hosing off engines after repairing hood hail damage. Water seeps into the spark plug hole, where engine heat converts it to steam, and damages the coil.

    Here are some rules to prevent the problem:

    1. Never wash the engine, unless you cover the coils.

    2. Always replace spark plug boots, when you change plugs.

    3. Always replace the spark plug, when you replace a coil.

    4. Always apply silicone dielectric grease to the rubber seal on the coil, where it connects to the engine; e.g. Motorcraft Silicone Brake Caliper Grease and Dielectric Compound (XG-3-A).

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    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 15,944, Reputation: 5553
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    #33

    Jun 21, 2008, 12:01 PM


    24. Fuel Injector Replacement

    1. Depressurize fuel system. On many Hondas, it's as simple as removing the gas cap. Other cars require removing the connector to the inertia switch in the trunk, or pulling the under-hood fuse to the fuel pump, starting the car, and waiting for the engine to stumble.

    2. Disconnect negative battery cable.

    3. Remove connectors from injectors.

    4. Disconnect vacuum hose and fuel return hose from fuel pressure regulator. Place a rag over hoses, before disconnecting.

    5. Disconnect fuel hose from fuel rail.

    6. Loosen retainer nuts on fuel rail and harness holder.

    7. Disconnect fuel rail.

    8. Remove injectors from intake manifold.

    9. Slide new cushion rings onto fuel injectors.

    10. Coat new O-rings with clean engine oil and place on injectors.

    11. Insert fuel injectors into fuel rail first.

    12. Coat new seal rings with clean engine oil and press into intake manifold.

    13. Install fuel injectors and fuel rail assembly into manifold. NOTE: To prevent damaging O-rings, install fuel injectors in fuel rail first, then install them in the intake manifold.

    14. Align center line on connector with mark on fuel rail, if applicable.

    15. Install and tighten retainer nuts.

    16. Connect fuel hose to fuel rail with new washers.

    17. Connect vacuum hose and fuel return hose to fuel pressure regulator.

    18. Install connectors on injectors.

    19. Turn ignition switch to ON, but do not operate the starter. After fuel pump runs for approximately two seconds, the fuel pressure in the fuel line rises. Repeat this two to three times, then check for fuel leaks.


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    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 15,944, Reputation: 5553
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    #34

    Jul 12, 2008, 07:55 PM
    21. Reading a Tire's Manufacturing Date

    Studies show that tires more than 6 years old can be very dangerous. Ensure that your "new" tires were recently manufactured, not sitting in the warehouse for years. Here's how to read the code on tires; for example, (3307) means the tire was manufactured in the 33rd week of 2007. The tire's manufacturing date is imbeded in the last code on the tire.


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    #35

    Aug 11, 2008, 08:02 AM
    13. Eliminating Air Conditioning System Odors

    Air conditioner odors can be unpleasant and unhealthy. Here's an inexpensive approach to get rid of the problem. Mix a solution of liquid dish soap and bleach in a spray bottle. Attach a suitable hose and pump the solution in the evaporator coil drain tube, which is located on the passenger's side of the firewall. Be sure to insert the hose all the way in. Afterwards, flush everything out with clean water.

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    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 15,944, Reputation: 5553
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    #36

    Aug 29, 2008, 09:56 PM
    Work in Progress.
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    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 15,944, Reputation: 5553
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    #37

    Nov 7, 2008, 08:40 AM
    14. Importance of Changing Automatic Transmission Filter

    The link below highlights the importance of dropping and cleaning the transmission pan, changing the transmission filter (each time), and refilling with automatic transmission fluid every 30,000 miles:

    http://www.amsoil.com/lit/filter_man_council01.pdf


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    TxGreaseMonkey's Avatar
    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 15,944, Reputation: 5553
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    #38

    Nov 9, 2008, 02:03 PM
    8. Antifreeze: Automaker Approved Chemistry

    Using the wrong antifreeze in your vehicle can be a costly mistake. No "one size fits all" antifreeze is approved for use in all vehicles. Play it safe and consult your Owner's Manual. The link below may help:

    http://www.valvoline.com/pdf/Zerex_CoolantChart.pdf

    Use a 50/50 mixture of approved antifreeze and distilled water, in order to minimize deposit buildup (cheaper and better). Otherwise, buy prediluted ready-to-use coolant, which is a 50/50 mixture of antifreeze and demineralized water (more expensive, but convenient).


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    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 15,944, Reputation: 5553
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    #39

    Nov 16, 2008, 05:37 AM
    5. How-to Clean the Mass Air Flow (MAF) Sensor

    Cleaning the MAF Sensor can increase gas mileage, horsepower, and general performance. This sensor measures air velocity, which the computer uses to determine proper air/fuel mixture. When the sensor gets covered with oil, dust, pollen, and air filter fibers, it results in a "rich" running engine, loss of power and higher emissions. Many recommend cleaning this sensor every time the air filter is changed.

    1. Disconnect negative battery cable.

    2. Remove screws (usually two Security Torx T-20) securing MAF Sensor to air intake and carefully remove sensor.

    3. Place sensor on a clean rag and spray hot-wires or hot plate with CRC MAF Sensor Cleaner 10 to 15 times, being careful not to touch the hot-wires. Be sure to spray all sides of the sensor and clean all wires and connectors. Other chemicals, such as brake cleaner and carburetor cleaner, are considered too aggressive, even though some people use them.

    4. Allow sensor to thoroughly dry for 45 minutes.

    5. Reinstall sensor in air intake and button everything up.


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    TxGreaseMonkey Posts: 15,944, Reputation: 5553
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    #40

    Nov 23, 2008, 09:38 AM
    6. How-to Change the Fuel Filter on Most Ford Cars and Trucks

    The inline fuel filter is usually located under the car, just in front of the right rear wheel. On many Ford pickup trucks, it's located in front of the left rear wheel. Be sure to wear safety goggles and keep a fire extinguisher handy. Change fuel filter every 30,000 miles.


    1. Raise vehicle and support securely on jack stands.

    2. Depressurize the fuel system. The usual recommendation is to disconnect the inertia switch connector, usually located in the right-rear trunk trim panel, start the car, and allow the engine to stumble. Removing the connector cuts power to the fuel pump. I prefer the following TRICK: Pull the under hood fuel pump fuse (much easier). On my 2000 Ford Taurus, it's Fuse No. 16 (20A). Check your Owner's Manual. On many Ford pickup trucks, remove the fuel pump relay from the under hood fuse/relay box.

    3. Clean fittings on each end of filter.

    4. Disconnect hairpin clips from the filter, by carefully prying upward with a small screwdriver. Separate fuel line from connector nipples on both ends of the filter, using a large screwdriver. On pickup trucks, use a 5/16" angled fuel line disconnect tool (Lisle 39410). If the inside release mechanism (spring) is rusted, spray with WD-40, PB Blaster, or Kroil.

    5. Remove filter from bracket and install new filter, noting the flow direction arrow. TRICK: Use plastic caps, that come with some filters, to prevent spilling gasoline from old filter. Retighten clamp.

    6. Reattach fuel lines, making sure they are fully seated, and install new hairpin clips.

    7. Reconnect inertia switch connector or replace fuel pump fuse/relay. It's good technique to clean oxidation from fuse or relay contacts (#240 abrasive cloth or steel wool) and lightly coat with dielectric grease.

    8. Start engine and check for fuel leaks.

    9. Update maintenance log.



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