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View Full Version : Is Propylene Glycol in your pet's food or treats?



ladyandjan
Nov 5, 2004, 08:32 PM
If it is please read the definition Websters dictionary from 1948. It is: a sweet, colorless, viscous liquid made from petroleum and otherwise, used as an ANTIFREEZE, germicide, solvent, etc. Would you eat ANTIFREEZE? Please stop feeding it to your pets! It is also found in cake mixes, makeup, coffee cakes, donuts, shampoo, toothpaste among other things. Also, these 2 sites will enlighten you as to what's really in 99.9% of the dog food. http://www.agp4animals.org and http://www.belfield.com

labman
Nov 7, 2004, 01:39 PM
Propylene glycol is widely used in both human and animal food because it is proven to be safe. Ordinary antifreezes are made of ethylene glycol which is quite toxic. Those truly interested in pet health would be spreading the word on replacing regular antifreeze with propylene glycol formulations such as Prestone Low-Tox, Sierra, and Evans Waterless antifreeze. The Prestone and maybe others is approved by the ASPCA.

ladyandjan
Nov 7, 2004, 09:42 PM
Propylene glycol is widely used in both human and animal food because it is proven to be safe. Ordinary antifreezes are made out of ethylene glycol which is quite toxic. Those truly interested in pet health would be spreading the word on replacing regular antifreeze with propylene glycol formulations such as Prestone Low-Tox, Sierra, and Evans Waterless antifreeze. The Prestone and maybe others is approved by the ASPCA.
Would need the URL of where you got your information from that this substance which is petroleum based is approved by the ASPCA. Also why is it being put in food of any kind? Human beings and animals are not metal radiators that would dry up and burst if they had no anti-freeze in them. This product is not safe for human or animal consumption. I do not know of anyone who goes around eating or drinking motor oil, antifreeze, gasoline or anything like that. Anyone who is eating or drinking anything with propylene glycol in it or feeding it to there pets has to do more research to see how unsafe it is.

labman
Nov 8, 2004, 05:40 AM
Propylene glycol is approved by the FDA as a food additive. It is widely used for a variety of purposes.

I first saw references to it being used as an antifreeze in RV's drinking water systems because unlike ethylene glycol, it is not toxic. About 10 years ago, Sierra began marketing a new antifreeze using propylene glycol, a long used as a food additive to protect our pets from the conventional, toxic material. As for the ASPCA approval, I found the information on the label of the contaier in my garage. The well being of our pets depends on facts, not emotional ranting and raving.

ladyandjan
Nov 8, 2004, 09:57 PM
Propylene glycol is approved by the FDA as a food additive. It is widely used for a variety of purposes.

I first saw references to it being used as an antifreeze in RV's drinking water systems because unlike ethylene glycol, it is not toxic. About 10 years ago, Sierra began marketing a new antifreeze using propylene glycol, a long used as a food additive to protect our pets from the conventional, toxic material. As for the ASPCA approval, I found the information on the label of the contaier in my garage. The well being of our pets depends on facts, not emotional ranting and raving.
I really don't care who approved ANTIFREEZE for human or animal consumption. They are off their rockers. Explain why it is in the food in the first place? To protect them from what? If they get enough of it in their food they will never lick any antifreeze from an open container in the home or off the floor since they've had their share from the food and wouldn't want anymore since they'd be full? No one would eat or drink this substance on their own. I will not and neither will any of my pets ever. I am not ranting or raving as you have put it. You need to do a lot more research on this chemical not just give a sentence off some label from your garage unless your really a mechanic-that would explain your agreeing with the 'establishment' as the know all and what they say is safe is so so you'll continue to follow what they say without thinking for yourself or allowing anyone else to do that either.

labman
Nov 9, 2004, 06:05 AM
Are you going to quit drinking water because it goes in radiators too? Do you know the citric acid commonly found in food and drinks is often used to clean radiators and as an industrial descaling agent? You are the one that needs to do some research. What do you know about propylene glycol? Yes it is used in antifreeze. Somebody realized a safe food additive works almost as well the toxic ethylene glycol. At an equal volume percent, the ethylene glycol gives a lower freeze protection. They made an antifreeze much safer for our children and pets, but still protects our cars almost as well. The standard 50/50 mixture of the propylene glycol protects down to -26 F adequate for most areas.

Propylene is glycol is used for many purposes, often as what is called a humidicant. It hydrates many organic materials much as water does, softening them. The 2 hydroxyls hydrogen bond to polar groups in molecules much as water does. It has the advantages of not only not drying up like water, but it can actually draw water out of the air to help maintain texture. There is an optimum texture to a dry dog food. It must be hard enough to exercise the jaw muscles and scrape tartar off the teeth. Those that feed canned or soft dog food do their pets no favor. On the other hand, it must not too hard to chew or soften in the stomach. Most Labs chew everything else they get ahold of, but not their food.

It is also used in other products to adjust viscosity and keep materials in solution. It is safe for human consumption and cheap to produce making it a good choice in many applications where its properties help achieve the desired characteristics. I hope these facts don't confuse you, having your mind already made up.

Twelling
Dec 30, 2004, 04:31 PM
Yeah Labman had it right from the beginning, you were just being plain out stubborn.

Factual
Oct 12, 2009, 10:47 PM
Material Safety Data Sheet
Propylene glycol MSDS
Product Name: Propylene glycol
Catalog Codes: SLP1162, SLP2974
CAS#: 57-55-6
RTECS: TY2000000
TSCA: TSCA 8(b) inventory: Propylene glycol
CI#: Not applicable.
Synonym: 1,2,-propanediol, 1,2-dihydroxypropane
Chemical Name: Propylene Glycol
Chemical Formula: CH3CHOHCH2OH
Potential Acute Health Effects:
Hazardous in case of ingestion. Slightly hazardous in case of skin contact (irritant, permeator), of eye contact
(irritant), of inhalation.
Potential Chronic Health Effects:
Slightly hazardous in case of skin contact (sensitizer).
CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS: Not available.
MUTAGENIC EFFECTS: Not available.
TERATOGENIC EFFECTS: Not available.
DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: Not available.
The substance may be toxic to central nervous system (CNS).
Repeated or prolonged exposure to the substance can produce target organs damage.
Section 11: Toxicological Information
Routes of Entry: Absorbed through skin. Eye contact.
Toxicity to Animals:
Acute oral toxicity (LD50): 18500 mg/kg [Rabbit].
Acute dermal toxicity (LD50): 20800 mg/kg [Rabbit].
Chronic Effects on Humans: May cause damage to the following organs: central nervous system (CNS).
Other Toxic Effects on Humans:
Hazardous in case of ingestion.
Slightly hazardous in case of skin contact (irritant, permeator), of inhalation.
Special Remarks on Toxicity to Animals: Not Safe.
Special Remarks on Chronic Effects on Humans:
Special Remarks on other Toxic Effects on Humans:
Acute Potential Health Effects:
Skin: May cause mild skin irritation. It may be absorbed through the skin and cause systemic effects similar to
Those of ingestion.
Eyes: May cause mild eye irritation with some immediate, transitory stinging, lacrimation, blepharospasm, and
Mild transient conjunctival hyperemia. There is no residual discomfort or injury once it is washed away.
Inhalation: May cause respiratory tract irritation.
Ingestion: It may cause gastrointestinal tract irritation. It may affect behavior/central nervous system(CNS
Depression, general anesthetic, convulsions, seizures, somnolence, stupor, muscle contraction or spasticity,
Coma), brain (changes in surface EEG), metabolism, blood (intravascular hemolysis, white blood cells - decreased
Neutrophil function), respiration (respiratory stimulation, chronic pulmonary edema, cyanosis), cardiovascular
System(hypotension, bradycardia, arrhythmias, cardiac arrest), endocrine system (hypoglycemia), urinary system
(kidneys), and liver.
Chronic Potential Health Effects:
Skin: Prolonged or repeated skin contact may cause allergic contact dermatitis.
Ingestion: Prolonged or repeated ingestion may cause hyperglycemia and may affect behavior/CNS (symptoms
Similar to that of acute ingestion).
Inhalation: Prolonged or repeated inhalation may affect behavior/CNS (with symptoms similar to ingestion), and
Spleen

Factual
Oct 12, 2009, 10:55 PM
Yes, its in a lot of pet foods and treats. My wife just brought home some Ol'Roy Dog treats, and its in the ingredients. Sixth on the list!! According to the MSDS mentioned below I should probably toss them... Don't you think!

shazamataz
Oct 13, 2009, 12:08 AM
Yes, its in alot of pet foods and treats. My wife just brought home some Ol'Roy Dog treats, and its in the ingredients. Sixth on the list!!! According to the MSDS mentioned below I should probably toss them..... Dont you think!

Did you even read labmans answer?

Thread closed.