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View Full Version : Help... I need to get into an email account.. my identity was stolen



happylady123
May 11, 2010, 06:32 PM
Hi, I am hoping someone can help me. I have been through a huge ordeal, someone stole my identity I don't know who it is, but my credit card company did give me the fake email address they used (the thief told the c.c company it was my new email). I need to get into this account to find out what personal info has been sent to them. They have made my life hell, they changed my address, phone numbers, took out bank accounts and tried to take out credit cards in my name. I have had a hard time proving I am me. I have filled out police reports and done everything I have to do, but I need to get into this email for peace of mind. Any help would be appreciated!! HELP PLEASE! Thanks

hheath541
May 11, 2010, 06:33 PM
Have you tried contacting the email provider and explaining your situation?

cdad
May 11, 2010, 06:34 PM
You get a court order and then you deal with the company that owns the email address. Make sure you have all the proof of your claims.

ScottGem
May 11, 2010, 06:45 PM
I can understand your anguish, but you aren't thinking this through. You claim your identity was stolen but you are asking us to help you break into someone else's e-mail. We have no idea if your claims are true (I'm not saying they aren't). So you are asking us to help you commit an illegal act.

As you have been advised, you need to do this legally. You provide proof that this e-mail was used in the commission of a crime (identity theft) and you get a court ordered subpoena to serve on the e-mail provider to provide access to the account and info about the person who created it.

JudyKayTee
May 12, 2010, 07:06 AM
My personal info was stolen. My bank refused to give me any information. I had to file a Police Report and report the identity theft.

I'm an investigator - I have never heard of the situation you describe (the creditor providing the fake info) because the cc companies don't want you to do your own investigation and/or hunt the person down.

Something doesn't sound right to me.

happylady123
May 12, 2010, 01:35 PM
I can understand your anguish, but you aren't thinking this through. You claim your identity was stolen but you are asking us to help you break into someone else's e-mail. We have no idea if your claims are true (I'm not saying they aren't). So you are asking us to help you commit an illegal act.

As you have been advised, you need to do this legally. You provide proof that this e-mail was used in the commission of a crime (identity theft) and you get a court ordered subpoena to serve on the e-mail provider to provide access to the account and info about the person who created it.

I am not asking anyone to help me break into someone else's email. They said it was MINE. The email is my name ______@yahoo.com (I will not provide my full name for obvious reasons). They created a fake email to give to my Credit Card company. I AM NOT ASKING ANYONE TO HELP WITH AN ILLEGAL ACT.

happylady123
May 12, 2010, 01:36 PM
My personal info was stolen. My bank refused to give me any information. I had to file a Police Report and report the identity theft.

I'm an investigator - I have never heard of the situation you describe (the creditor providing the fake info) because the cc companies don't want you to do your own investigation and/or hunt the person down.

Something doesn't sound right to me.

The CC company asked me if this is still my right email address, that's how I found it.

happylady123
May 12, 2010, 01:40 PM
These people stole my name, my ss number, changed my address and email address, changed my phone numbers on accounts. They took out additional cc. and opened bank accounts. The police can't do too much because they don't know who it is. Again, I'm not asking anyone to help with something illegal. I am trying to make sure these people who stole my identity don't get anymore info on me and not to be rude, but if you can't help with the email, please don't respond.

artlady
May 12, 2010, 01:46 PM
My personal info was stolen. My bank refused to give me any information. I had to file a Police Report and report the identity theft.

I'm an investigator - I have never heard of the situation you describe (the creditor providing the fake info) because the cc companies don't want you to do your own investigation and/or hunt the person down.

Something doesn't sound right to me.

Off topic here a bit,sorry to the op but why doesn't the CC want you to do your own investigation? Just curious.

Fr_Chuck
May 12, 2010, 03:04 PM
Bluntly this email address belongs to a crook that stole your ID, it does not belong to you. I would be free to open a email account with your name, or any name I want as long as it is not already used. Plus there are also many people with the same name,

So no this is not YOUR account, it may be one used in fraud, and in that case the police can investigate it, not you.

ScottGem
May 12, 2010, 03:34 PM
I am not asking anyone to help me break into someone else's email. They said it was MINE. The email is my name ______@yahoo.com (I will not provide my full name for obvious reasons). They created a fake email to give to my Credit Card company. I AM NOT ASKING ANYONE TO HELP WITH AN ILLEGAL ACT.

Sorry, but that's exactly what you are doing! Did you create the account? Do you know the password? Then it's NOT your account. And trying to break into that account IS an illegal act!


These people stole my name, my ss number, changed my address and email address, changed my phone numbers on accounts. They took out additional cc. and opened bank accounts. The police can't do to much because they don't know who it is. Again, I'm not asking anyone to help with something illegal. I am trying to make sure these people who stole my identity don't get anymore info on me and not to be rude, but if you can't help with the email, please don't respond.

I understand that this is very upsetting to you and very hard on you. But you have to look at it from our side. All you are is a name on a bulletin board. You could be a wife trying to get into her husband's e-mail or a teenager trying to break into a teacher's e-mail or any one of a dozen other scenarios. Or you could be exactly what you say you are. WE DON'T KNOW. Ergo, helping you break into an e-mail account is an illegal act!

If you don't want to be rude, then don't be. YOU do not dictate who can answer your questions or how they can answer. As long as the answer doesn't violate our rules (in which case you use the report link) then it is valid and you have no right to object.

Finally we told you what to do. You were given good advice to obtain a subpoena to try and get the information. That is the ONLY way you will get it. The fact that you ignored that advice and continue to want to break into the account, does not speak well for you.

happylady123
May 12, 2010, 04:28 PM
sorry, but that's exactly what you are doing! Did you create the account? Do you know the password? Then it's not your account. And trying to break into that account is an illegal act!



I understand that this is very upsetting to you and very hard on you. But you have to look at it from our side. All you are is a name on a bulletin board. You could be a wife trying to get into her husband's e-mail or a teenager trying to break into a teacher's e-mail or any one of a dozen other scenarios. Or you could be exactly what you say you are. We don't know. Ergo, helping you break into an e-mail account is an illegal act!

If you don't want to be rude, then don't be. You do not dictate who can answer your questions or how they can answer. As long as the answer doesn't violate our rules (in which case you use the report link) then it is valid and you have no right to object.

Finally we told you what to do. You were given good advice to obtain a subpoena to try and get the information. That is the only way you will get it. The fact that you ignored that advice and continue to want to break into the account, does not speak well for you.

Well then, thanks so much for that truly wonderful advice. Thank god you were able to tell me of my wrong ways. I'm sure you do understand how upsetting it is, when did you have your identity stolen?

cdad
May 12, 2010, 04:41 PM
well then, thanks so much for that truely wonderful advice. Thank god you were able to tell me of my wrong ways. I'm sure you do understand how upsetting it is, when did you have your identity stolen?

I don't quite think your understanding the situation. The problem with identity theft is that there is a multi level platform that comes with it. Example. If someone stole your credit card number and charged items and then you reported it but were not held liable for the charges then the crime is against the credit card company and not you because they are the ones suffering the loss. Yes your dignity was shattered, There is an emotional attatchment. But the fact remains that you lost 0 dollars in the transaction. Most police departments aren't equipt nor do they follow up on such crimes. It is a cyber crime. Now if the charges were in their jurisdiction then they can do something. Your other possible out would be to ask the investigator (detective) if they could call on your behalf. But the problem is then liability because should you be able to track down and beat the snot out of the person they (the police) could get into serious trouble. There are a lot of fine lines in this. Plus at best all Yahoo could give you is some forms on an I.P. address and then the rest would require you to do a lot of work and court time outside of the area you live if not international.

happylady123
May 12, 2010, 04:43 PM
Bluntly this email address belongs to a crook that stole your ID, it does not belong to you. I would be free to open a email account with your name, or any name I want as long as it is not already used. Plus there are also many people with the exact same name,

So no this is not YOUR account, it may be one used in fraud, and in that case the police can investigate it, not you.

Unfortunately, I was told by my police detective that was assigned to the case, that identity theft is common and the thief isn't always caught.

ScottGem
May 12, 2010, 04:45 PM
I don't have to have had my identity stolen to understand how upsetting it would be. I guard my identity carefully, shredding everything, monitoring my credit reports etc. Last year someone did use one of my credit cards fraudulently. While its not what you say happened to you, it does help me understand.

I seem to detect a sarcastic tone in your writing. You came here asking for help. You got the only kind of help we can give. This is a law forum. Our answers here have to conform to statutory law and legal ethics. I'm sorry if you are not happy with that, but we are not here to please you, we are here to give the best and most accurate advice we can.

happylady123
May 12, 2010, 04:48 PM
I don't have to have had my identity stolen to understand how upsetting it would be. I guard my identity carefully, shredding everything, monitoring my credit reports etc. Last year someone did use one of my credit cards fraudulently. While its not what you say happened to you, it does help me understand.

I seem to detect a sarcastic tone in your writing. You came here asking for help. You got the only kind of help we can give. This is a law forum. Our answers here have to conform to statutory law and legal ethics. I'm sorry if you are not happy with that, but we are not here to please you, we are here to give the best and most accurate advice we can.

Again awsome!

ScottGem
May 12, 2010, 04:51 PM
again awsome!

Well, in all modesty, I must agree. My answers generally are awesome!

happylady123
May 12, 2010, 05:01 PM
Well, in all modesty, I must agree. My answers generally are awesome!

LOL, I guess if you don't pat yourself on the back who will?

Fr_Chuck
May 12, 2010, 05:02 PM
And almost as good as mine, LOL

But we really are sorry for you, and wish we could tell you to go beat that info out of the web site owners but that is not the legal issues. And you are right, these people are seldom caught since the police don't have the man power and it normally takes place over several cities or locations and the city police can do little and it is not that big of crime for FBI to put a lot into it.

And if it is a email address like hotmail, or g mail or Yahoo mail, they are set up without any real ID and no way to really trace the person back

happylady123
May 12, 2010, 05:04 PM
And almost as good as mine, LOL

but we really are sorry for you, and wish we could tell you to go beat that info out of the web site owners but that is not the legal issues. And you are right, these people are seldom caught since the police don't have the man power and it normally takes place over several cities or locations and the city police can do little and it is not that big of crime for FBI to put alot into it.

And if it is a email address like hotmail, or g mail or yahoo mail, they are set up without any real ID and no way to really trace the person back

Yes, I know that's why I really just wanted to make sure they weren't getting into anything else, thanks though.

JudyKayTee
May 12, 2010, 05:28 PM
To answer Artlady's question - if I did not want to report my ID as stolen I could do whatever I wanted to obtain the identity of the person who opened the accounts - and who also, by the way, changed my address to another address. If I wanted to do my own invetigation (and keep in mind that that's what I do) I could claim it on my Homeowners Insurance, the cc company would step back and I would be on my own.

I was NOT happy with the entire situation because in my case "someone" flew from NY to London on my cc, HAD to show ID of some sort and the cc company would not give me the new mailing address.

I reported the problem to the State Troopers, the cc company reversed everything and I never heard another word.

Fr_Chuck
May 12, 2010, 05:31 PM
And of course if you keep all three of your credit bureau reports frozen they will not really be able to do a lot anyway,
And check your report at least three times a year to be sure no one is applying for credit in your name somehow.

ScottGem
May 12, 2010, 06:05 PM
And of course if you keep all three of your credit bureau reports frozen they will not really be able to do alot anyway,
and check your report at least three times a year to be sure no one is applying for credit in your name somehow.

Chuck makes a good point. The monitoring services the Credit bureaus sell is well worth it, especially once your identity has been compromised. You can set it so that any request for credit is reported to you BEFORE they release info to the inquirer. That can help catch the perp before they create the accounts.

By the way, even though the thieves charged over $2K on my card, it didn't cost me anything. The card issuer issued a credit the first month, then when there were more charges the second month, they closed the account and issued me a new card.