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View Full Version : How do I stop LG front load washer from shaking?



Robert Gift
Apr 17, 2010, 04:30 AM
It is on its own pedestal.
I leveled all feet to perfect level and all were tight. (Weight evenly distributed as far as I couldiscern.)
On spin it can vibrate so much that it moves. (even with small wash load.)

We placed rubber pads made for these washers purchased at Home Depot.
Better but it still will move.

I am considering drilling holes in the floor and BOLTING it down
To the floor from the crawl space beneath.

Using braces, shall I securely attach the washer to its dryer?
Any ideas?

Thank you.

Robert

hkstroud
Apr 17, 2010, 05:38 AM
This might not apply since you have a front loader.

Is the drain hose just inserted in the washer stand pipe or is it a sealed connection?

With top loading machines, a little water is left in the tub to help clothes move around to balance. If the drain hose is sealed in the washer stand pipe and the venting of the stand pipe is not correct, a siphoning action can pull all of the water out of the tub.
Without that residual water, that bundle of wet clothes cannot move around to become a balanced load.

If the drain hose is sealed in the stand pipe, temporarily remove the seal and see what happens.

I wouldn't consider bolting the machine down. For what ever reason, you have a problem of balancing the load. Bolting won't solve that problem and the undue stress will have a detrimental affect on the machine.

Robert Gift
Apr 17, 2010, 05:47 AM
Thanks, HK.
The front loader has a 1-inch diameter drain hose!
It does go up to drain into the typical drain/faucet inset.
Yes, as a child I used to defeat the door safety button and watch the top loader start spinning full of water to allow the clothes to spread out and redistribute to aid balance.

applguy
Apr 18, 2010, 07:25 PM
The short answer is: you can't stop it from shaking. All front loading washers shake to some degree. Different brands and different models handle different situations differently. That said, the biggest problem I see with this is when someone tries to wash a load of clothes that is too small for a front loaders' capacity. All the manufacturers seem to be producing these enormous capacity washers when peoples' households are getting smaller, not bigger. It is incredibly important that the load be sorted properly, i.e. by color AND by fabric type. What this means is don't wash jeans with towels or the like. Everything needs to be similar in weight because we can't control how the clothing tumbles in the washer. If something outweighs other things, the machine will have to choose between finishing the cycle or stopping because it can't distribute the clothes in a balanced manner. Let me tell you, the machine will always finish the cycle. We also need to make sure that there is enough clothing in the tub so the machine can distribute the articles all the way around the circumference of the basket, thus allowing for a smoother spin. It also seems to be helpful to make sure all items are loaded into the machine individually, and not rolled up in a ball. Make sure the jam nuts on the legs are tight. Make sure the screws holding the washer to the pedestal are tight. Make sure the washer feet aren't standing on the floor in between the joists. Wood flexes, even when there's tile on it. If all else fails, get it off the pedestal. Raising the machine also raises its center of gravity, thus making it more unstable. Personally, I have never understood why an engineer would put such a heavy machine on such a flimsy pedestal... or why salespeople sell them. Good luck.

Robert Gift
Apr 20, 2010, 08:34 AM
The short answer is: you can't stop it from shaking. All front loading washers shake to some degree. Different brands and different models handle different situations differently. ... Personally, I have never understood why an engineer would put such a heavy machine on such a flimsy pedestal...or why salespeople sell them. Good luck.Thank you, Guy.
I was afraid you'd say that.
Rubber vibration feet helped and there is less noise but it still is a problem.

I have moved the washer as close to the wall (exterior on foundation) as possible.
Now am considering running long bolts through two 4x4"s spanning the floor joists.
Running the bolts up through the floor, through the rubber vibration blocks and screwed into the washer in place of the feet.
Any objections to that?
Thank you.

applguy
Apr 20, 2010, 05:20 PM
Well, can't say I've ever seen it done, but front loading washers in laundromats are bolted down. I think the chances of damaging the machine are slim, but I think it is still possible. I would certainly make sure its easy for you to undo so when you need a service technician's assistance he doesn't soak you for having to undo it to move the machine for service. It also may stop the machine moving around but it may not stop the noise. If the tub wants to jump around due to imbalance problems and the cabinet won't move, the tub is still going to jump (maybe even harder/farther) and may contact another internal component. That's the only way I can see machine damage resulting. Good luck.

Robert Gift
Apr 20, 2010, 07:16 PM
Yes, in the tall crawl space I could easily remove the bolts.

I'll have to drill or make holes through the floor tiles.

Since the pedestal may be part of the problem, I probably should tie the washer and dryer together with and X bracket in the back.
There is also a little space between each unit and its pedestal and I can run two brackets beneath.

KISS
Apr 20, 2010, 09:18 PM
Did you remove all the shipping shims and screws?

Any suspension parts missing or damaged?

What happens when the washer is empty?

Robert Gift
Apr 22, 2010, 05:49 PM
Did you remove all the shipping shims and screws?
Any suspension parts missing or damaged?
What happens when the washer is empty?Yes, all removed and accounted for.
Can'tell if any suspension parts are missing or broken.
Sometimes it spins perfectly smoothly.
I'd like to spin the tub empty but don't know how to get it to that part of the cycle.

Robert Gift
Apr 25, 2010, 03:24 AM
Any suspension parts missing or damaged?
What happens when the washer is empty?Am even thinking of isolating the washer from the house by pouring a cement base and extending floor jacks up to holes I'd make in the laundry room floor.

The washer would be resting on the cement block in the crawlspace soil.
I'd have to cross-brace the metal jack poles and figure a way to attach the clotheswasher feet to the poles.

Angrycustomer
Jun 15, 2010, 02:07 PM
The short answer is: you can't stop it from shaking. All front loading washers shake to some degree. Different brands and different models handle different situations differently. That said, the biggest problem I see with this is when someone tries to wash a load of clothes that is too small for a front loaders' capacity. All the manufacturers seem to be producing these enormous capacity washers when peoples' households are getting smaller, not bigger. It is incredibly important that the load be sorted properly, i.e. by color AND by fabric type. What this means is don't wash jeans with towels or the like. Everything needs to be similar in weight because we can't control how the clothing tumbles in the washer. If something outweighs other things, the machine will have to choose between finishing the cycle or stopping because it can't distribute the clothes in a balanced manner. Let me tell you, the machine will always finish the cycle. We also need to make sure that there is enough clothing in the tub so the machine can distribute the articles all the way around the circumference of the basket, thus allowing for a smoother spin. It also seems to be helpful to make sure all items are loaded into the machine individually, and not rolled up in a ball. Make sure the jam nuts on the legs are tight. Make sure the screws holding the washer to the pedestal are tight. Make sure the washer feet aren't standing on the floor in between the joists. Wood flexes, even when theres tile on it. If all else fails, get it off the pedestal. Raising the machine also raises its center of gravity, thus making it more unstable. Personally, I have never understood why an engineer would put such a heavy machine on such a flimsy pedestal...or why salespeople sell them. Good luck.
+
What your saying is come down off the pedestal. Have you ever fastened red brick to the inside of the pedestals before installing? Makes them less flimsy. Karma.

juhgyt4
Feb 6, 2011, 01:05 AM
You guys are just *****in. get a life these units are great. Wha wha wha I'm a spoiled ***** I have front loaders and I'm griping wha wha wha. Get a life you guysmake me sick!

pulzmez
May 4, 2012, 07:21 PM
I purchased lg front load washer and dryer and the washer danced all over the laundry room. I purchased a rubber mat used for exercising equipment and large enough to fit under both washer and dryer. Keeps them even in height and works great!! I strongly recommend doing this. Ours also have the pedestals under each unit. You won't be disappointed.

drtom4444
May 5, 2012, 12:55 PM
The best solution is to buy a top loading washer, and it's probably cheaper. The front loading models have a design defect of them using metal combinations that cause very bad corrosion from electrolysis. They built the machines with aluminum spider gears and stainless steel drums. Aluminum has a higher reactivity than steel so electrons cause the aluminum to corrode quickly.(see: Google Image Result for http://www.revisescience.co.uk/2011/images/reactivity_series.gif (http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.revisescience.co.uk/2011/images/reactivity_series.gif&imgrefurl=http://www.revisescience.co.uk/2011/schools/hach/sc1metals.asp&h=300&w=400&sz=7&tbnid=PQMZComL6c5FTM:&tbnh=92&tbnw=122&zoom=1&docid=vgTWh0z0s2mWHM&sa=X&ei=6YOlT5fdDYqo8QSgvoTvBg&ved=0CHMQ9QEwAw&dur=3904) ) This happens and causes the washer to become very unbalanced. Replace the washer with a top loading model.