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ehny11001
Aug 1, 2006, 12:32 PM
Can a person with a felony conviction that occurred over 45 years ago be bonded. The conviction did not have anything to do with theft.

ScottGem
Aug 1, 2006, 12:39 PM
Maybe, doesn't hurt to try.

ehny11001
Aug 1, 2006, 12:41 PM
Thanks for the support

excon
Aug 1, 2006, 02:43 PM
Hello ehny:

Sure. There's no law that says you can't. The fact that your record is 45 years old is a big plus.

excon

GaryArt
Aug 31, 2006, 11:20 PM
Not only can a felon be bonded, but there is a Federal program that will guarantee a bond of up to $10,000, if if it a requirement for employment. It is called the Federal Bonding Program, and it is administered by the U.S. Dep't of Labor.

RichardBondMan
Nov 6, 2006, 09:10 PM
Bonded for what ? I write bonds, not criminal bail bonds but miscellaneous surety bonds, i.e. notary bonds, contractor license/permit bonds, lost instrument bonds, license bonds for auto dealers, auctioneers. There are also fidelity bonds that cover dishonest acts. Please explain for what purpose does need to be "bonded", then maybe I can answer. Excon says there is no law that you cant be bonded - I don't know that I agree, let's say you want a $10,000.00 notary bond, and that's exactly what the State of AL requires where I am located, now to be a notary you have to be a registered voter, maybe Excon can explain how a convicted felon can vote?

ScottGem
Nov 7, 2006, 06:02 AM
Bonded for what ? I write bonds, not criminal bail bonds but miscellaneous surety bonds, ie, notary bonds, contractor license/permit bonds, lost instrument bonds, license bonds for auto dealers, auctioneers. There are also fidelity bonds that cover dishonest acts. Please explain for what purpose does need to be "bonded", then maybe I can answer. Excon says there is no law that you cant be bonded - I dont know that I agree, let's say you want a $10,000.00 notary bond, and that's exactly what the State of AL requires where I am located, now to be a notary you have to be a registered voter, maybe Excon can explain how a convicted felon can vote?

People are generally bonded when they are hired for a job that has the potential to steal large sums from the employer. Security Guards, Accountants and other job categories may require bonding. This is basically a form of insurance. Like any insurance there is a risk factor that the insurer needs to weigh before issuing a policy. If someone has stolen before, then there exists a significant risk factor.

RichardBondMan
Nov 7, 2006, 08:27 AM
Yep, some States now allow convicted felons to vote, I think it's a rather new phenonom though, don't expect it be allowed in many states, huh, might be wrong.

GaryArt
Nov 7, 2006, 09:01 PM
Actually, the move toward allowing felons to vote is growing. In a few states, the law does NOT disenfranchise felons at all - that is, a felony conviction has no effecton your right to vote. In one or two states, prison inmates cast absentee ballots while they are still locked up!

Quite a few states auomatically restore the right to vote upon release from prison; some require that any parole or probation be completed first.

In other states, laws are being changed to provide for a process whereby a felon, once his or her sentence is completed, can apply for the restoration of voting rights.

The trend toward allowing felons to vote is fueled by several things:

Since a disproportionate number of felons are minorities, some suggest that barring felons from voting hits minorities harder than whites, and, therefore, has a racially prejudicial effect, even if that was not anyone's specific intent.

Next, some research has suggested that reintegrating an ex-offender beck into the community as much as possible, and as quickly as possible, lowers that chances they will break the law again.

Finally, there is a legal and Constitutional issue. Our Federal constitution prohibits what is called "attainder" or "outlawry". These are very old words to describe something that was common 200 years ago, but has never been the practice here. Basically, it is pronouncing someone to be permanently changed to less than a full human, or a full citizen, because of a conviction (in olden times, your entire family was marked because of one persons' crime).

The prohibition against attainder means the state cannot say "He is a felon now and forever. The police do not have to protect him, he cannot sue or use the courts", etc. Basically, you have no rights. Ever.

Some jurists and legal scholars have argued that permamently barring a person from voting amounts to attainder, and is therefor unconstitutional.

Personally, I think people voting from prison is ridiculous. And while I would probably be OK with felons applying to havr their rights restored after demonstrating tha they are truly reformed, I don't know about automatically giving them anything.

As for the legal issue, I'll leave that to the lawyers to argue about, and the judges to decide.

As for BondMan's point, while someone could theoretically get someone to write a bond, I do not believe ANY state would ever issue a notary commission to a convicted felon.

Danyael
Mar 20, 2007, 07:29 PM
Gary Art IS correct. Also, each state ALSO has their own bonding program for ex-offenders. If you're unsure of where to go/who to call, you can start with the local probation office and speak with a probation officer only or supervisor. General clerks don't deal with that sort of thing. Also, the PO may direct you to some local resources as well.

RichardBondMan
Mar 21, 2007, 05:42 PM
Danyael, (and others reading all the post to this thread), I think most everyone's missing the original question "can a felon be bonded ?" The discussion seems to be "can a felon vote" --- regardless, I still would like to know the answer I posed to ehny11001, and that was "bonded for what?". There are two basic types of bonds, fidelity and surety and within each type can be found many specific types of bonds. I have issued as an underwriter, many of each type and some perhaps to convicted felons. So to attempt to answer the question "can a felon be bonded", one has to know for what. As to Danyael's info that each state has their own bonding program, anyone answering the question needs to know bonding for what purpose - I cannot imagine for example, that the convicted felon has lost or otherwide misplaced an original bank certificate of deposit and he wants a duplicate issued by the bank and the felon (and owner of the CD) can provide the bank (that now has two outstanding CD's) with a surety bond issued by the state to quarantee that if the original CD and the duplicate were to be presented for payment, that the bank can recoup at least the value of one CD. I would not want my tax dollars to go for guaranteeing surety bonds for anyone. I would want a private company such as an insurance/surety company to take that risk. I do understand most people have to work, convicted felon or not, and I can understand the need for workplace dishonesty insurance being guaranteed by the Dept or Labor or even a state Dept of Labor but guaranteeing or issuing surety bond for the purpose I described would not seem practical or reasonable. There are many other types of bonds I would not want our tax dollars subsidizing, i.e. bonds for a person wanting to sell cars, it's called a license bond and is a surety bond required by most states if one wishes to obtain a license to sell cars. Or take for example a liquor tax bond guaranteeing that if the bar owner doesn't pay his liquor taxes, then the surety has to pay them. Or a utility payment bond guaranteeing that if the retail establishment/retaurant, etc doesn't pay their power bill, the surety has to pay or a "pistol toting bond" for a person who say lives in FL and wants to carry a weapon and if that person violates the terms of his permit to carry the weapon then the bond is forfeited, etc, etc, etc. even an alleged criminal bail bond is a type of surety bond and it essentially guarantees that if the alleged crimininal law violator does not appear in court, then the bond is forfeited to the court. Would we want our tax dollars involved and at risk for these types of bonds - that's why I would like to know bonded for what ?

Scooter151
Aug 23, 2009, 04:36 AM
There is a federal bonding program created by the US Dept. of Labor that is also run through most states: <a href="http://www.bonds4jobs.com/index.html">Federal Bonding Program</a> There is no cost or fees for employees or the employer, and from what I was able to find, the program offers between $5,000 to $25,000 coverage for a 6-month period.