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tjjz337
Feb 3, 2008, 05:58 PM
We are having some sort of plumbing problem. When it rains for several days our toilets will not flush. We never have trouble with the showers or sinks, however while having this problem, when we take a shower the toilet does gurgle, but the shower drains fine. Could this be aproblem with the septic tank, drainfield vent pipe, or what. This is driving me crazy!

We live in a single floor house with two bathrooms, one behind the other in the floorplan. We do not have city sewer, a septic tank.

Thanks

hkstroud
Feb 3, 2008, 06:58 PM
You have a problem with the distribution field of you septic tank. Water comes out of the septic tank in pipes and is distributed out into the ground. Over time this area can become saturated and when it rains there is too much water in the ground for the water in the septic tank to come out. Time to call the septic tank guy and have new or additional lines put in another area.

tjjz337
Feb 3, 2008, 08:11 PM
We are having some sort of plumbing problem. When it rains for several days our toilets will not flush. We never have trouble with the showers or sinks, however while having this problem, when we take a shower the toilet does gurgle, but the shower drains fine. Could this be aproblem with the septic tank, drainfield vent pipe, or what. This is driving me crazy!!

We live in a single floor house with two bathrooms, one behind the other in the floorplan. We do not have city sewer, a septic tank.

Thanks
If that's the case, why don't we have problems with the shower draining. Not that I am doubting you, this is what we thought anyway, but we were hoping for a less expensive answer.

hkstroud
Feb 3, 2008, 09:44 PM
You have more water going to the septic tank, concequently you have more water going out of the septic tank, faster, from the toilet.

ballengerb1
Feb 4, 2008, 08:47 AM
I think Harold nailed this one. You may find that your soil will no longer pass a perc test and may be saturated. How long has it been since you had your tank pumped and inspected? I'd get that done now, just to start.

tjjz337
Feb 4, 2008, 07:11 PM
We bought this house two years ago and have not had it pumped or inspected at all. How often should we pump?

hkstroud
Feb 4, 2008, 09:32 PM
You will probably get a different answer each time you ask that question. The septic tank guy will probably tell you every year or two. Pumping removes the things in the tank that don't get dissolved. These can get out into the lines and into the holes in the pipe preventing the sewage form getting out and being distributed into the ground. I have a small mobile home park on septic tanks. Recently had my first problems with septic tanks. Sewage was coming out the end of the pipe, presumably because the pipe holes were clogged. This occurred even though the area was undergoing a long dry spell. Probably should have had the tanks pumped years ago, but hey, I got away with it for 25 years.
Your problem is different, you problem is that the ground cannot take any more water from the septic tank when it rains. The ground is saturated.

You probably should have the tanks pumped but that won't solve the problem.

ballengerb1
Feb 5, 2008, 08:47 AM
Harold is correct about getting a different answer every time you ask about pumping. My mom and dad never pumped their tank and I lived there for 21 years. Where I am now we are required to pump every five years. Pumping doesn't do much other than give your field a break for a few days and removed undigested sewage. It does give the opportunity to inspect the tank and catch problems early on. A broken baffle could be allowing solids into your field and that will cause a big problem.

Sand Daddy
Feb 5, 2008, 09:04 AM
Soil conditions vary from site to site, this will determine frequency of pumping.

ballengerb1
Feb 5, 2008, 10:18 AM
Soil does play a big part in a septic system and passing a perc test is a big requirement. A lot also depends on what you put into your septic. Many things get flushed or rinsed down the drain that will never be digested such as paint, drywall mud, and an occasional diamond ring at my house.

hkstroud
Feb 5, 2008, 01:37 PM
occasional diamond ring at my house

I've heard of bobing for apples but "Diving for diamonds".

timinator2000
Dec 19, 2011, 10:36 PM
I'm having the same problem only we have a city sewer system? We've live in the house for about 12 years and never had this problem. It has rained quite a bit here today and over the past week. I've tried plunging both toilets and it still didn't drain. Any ideas?

speedball1
Dec 20, 2011, 06:51 AM
Hi timinator and welcome to the Plumbing pageat at AskMeHelpDesk.com. You piggybacked on an a 4 year old dead thread so I gave you one of your own. In the future, before you post, look in the upper left hand corner for the date.
I think you've come across one of the many drawbacks of combining your rain water run off with your
House sewer. In my area it's illegal to do this. Several things come to mind.
The best way would be to disconnect the rainwater from your sewer and divert it to a home made dry well.(see image).
If that doesn't "float your boat" you van install a sewer check valve,(see image) just after the house cleanout to prevent any backups from flooding your basement. The drawback to this is that when the check valve's closed you won't be able to flush or drain anything until it opens back up. What's your pleasure? Good luck, Tom